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Visiting a goat friend at Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary in Deer Trail, CO.

Visiting a goat friend last year at Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary in Deer Trail, CO.

There are a lot of causes, organizations, and nonprofits out there doing amazing work for non-human animals. While many of us in the vegan/animal welfare movement know of some of the “big names” like Farm Sanctuary, Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, etc., many sanctuaries doing wonderful work fly under the radar.

Some reasons why some sanctuaries become more famous than others include: geography (whether or not the sanctuary is centrally located or near a major city or hub), celebrity endorsements (or lack thereof), funding (not to be ironic given that we’re talking about places that take care of chickens, but it’s a “chicken and the egg” issue, as well; sometimes better known organizations get more funding, and then have the resources to invest in marketing/PR and become better known, etc.), marketing and PR skills of the founders or staff (again, this goes back to resources), the “quality” of the visitor facilities (do they have a guest house for high-end donors to stay in, should they want to visit? Do they have personable folks available to run the tours?) and more.

I absolutely love one particular “famous” sanctuary: Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary. I’m proud that 100% of the proceeds of The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will support WFAS now, and forever (or as long as folks wish to pick up a virtual copy). I don’t believe that sanctuaries should have to “compete” for our support; I believe in an abundance in the movement where we can support multiple organizations (including supporting in non-monetary ways such as donating our volunteer time, which is wonderful, too).

As a movement, we could do a better job with supporting sanctuaries who may not have the marketing muscle or visitor facilities or restaurant partnerships that other “better known” sanctuaries have. I believe there is room for us to concurrently support sanctuaries of all statuses, as long as we feel they are doing amazing work, are treating their human- and non-human animals well, and stand for the values we believe in.

With all this in mind, I’m thrilled to be putting the spotlight on two animal sanctuaries that are dear to me: VINE in Springfield, VT and Peaceful Prairie in Deer Trail, CO.

Pattrice Jones of VINE Sanctuary.

pattrice jones with a member of VINE Sanctuary.

Name: Veganism Is The Next Evolution (VINE) Sanctuary

Year Founded: 2000

Founders: Miriam and pattrice jones

Location: Springfield, VT

Website: http://vine.bravebirds.org/

Mission: VINE Sanctuary provides a haven for animals who have escaped or been rescued from the meat, dairy and egg industries or other abusive circumstances, such as cockfights or pigeon-shoots. Sanctuary residents include chickens, cows, ducks, doves, geese, pigeons, sheep, emus, and even a few parakeets. In addition to sheltering and advocating for animals, they conduct research and education aimed at creating systemic changes in agriculture, trade, and consumption as well as human attitudes about animals and the environment. VINE works within an ecofeminist understanding of the interconnection of all life and the intersection of all forms of oppression. Thus VINE welcomes and works to facilitate alliances among animal, environmental, and social justice activists. (Source: http://vine.bravebirds.org/about-us/)

Sharkey of VINE Sanctuary

Sharkey of VINE Sanctuary

Why I Love VINE: Since getting to know VINE, I’ve really appreciated their approach to queering vegan and animal welfare issues. Their intersectional work to support human- and non-human animals concurrently is something with which I completely agree. I love that they are queer-run, and when they have difficult decisions to make, they have them in the barn near the animals (how cool is that?).

I haven’t visited yet, but I love their adorable status updates about the sanctuary and animals on VINE’s Facebook page. I’m proud to know and support them.

Donate To VINE Sanctuary

Donate To VINE Sanctuary

 


 

Peaceful Prairie SanctuaryName: Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary

Year Founded: 1997

Founders: Michele and Chris Alley-Grubb

Location: Deer Trail, CO

 

Website: http://www.peacefulprairie.org/

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Mission: The mission at Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary is to provide a safe, loving and permanent home for rescued farmed animals – not accepted at most shelters. In addition to providing life-long care for the animals, Peaceful Prairie is dedicated to promoting vegan living as the only way to end the suffering and exploitation of animals (Source: http://www.peacefulprairie.org/about.html)

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Why I Love Peaceful Prairie: After visiting Peaceful Prairie in 2013, I fell in love. Read a bit about my experience in my blog post recounting my visit. Peaceful Prairie isn’t a “glamorous” sanctuary, but the staff work tirelessly to create a loving and peaceful rescue for non-human animals. This sanctuary is also located in a very rancher-run rural part of Colorado, and the sanctuary receives threats from local farms who don’t want their animal-loving presence near their animal-killing and abusing industries. It’s a miracle that Peaceful Prairie exists, and an honor to support them.

Donate to Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary.

Donate to Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary.


Thanks so much for reading! In the comments, I’d love to hear about the sanctuaries you love and support which aren’t featured as often in the media. xo

 

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Linger in Denver

Linger in Denver, CO

Last night was a superb one–not only did Courtney and I move back into our apartment after three weeks away (it was being repaired post-Boulder flood)–but we were also treated to a magical vegan dinner at Linger in Denver, CO with fabulous new friends The Gay Vegans!

I have admired Dan and Mike of The Gay Vegans from afar for a long time, so it was such a treat to get to meet them! I so admire their compassionate approach to vegan activism; kinder, more caring and passionate vegan activists I’ve never found. These guys are also smart, witty, and charming, and Courtney and I had a lovely time trying out one of their favorite vegan-friendly restaurants, Linger. The Gay Vegans have written about Linger before on their fabulous blog, which you can check out here.

Starting with sweet potato waffle fries and a sweet dipping sauce, we elected to split dishes including a delightful seasonal butternut squash salad, dosas, and a unique carrot falafel dish that came with a smoky, cheesy-like sauce. Heavenly! We also enjoyed some incredibly prepared watermelon appetizers with sugared spicy topping.

For dessert, after laughing and sharing stories and getting to know the people behind the blogs (!), we enjoyed tangerine sorbet and a melt-in-your-mouth homemade peanut butter cup dish that kicked store-bought versions to the curb. Linger has a to-live-for location with a great view of Downtown Denver and a sweet rooftop bar. Linger isn’t a vegan restaurant, but they do right by vegan gourmands! I really love when restaurants that aren’t exclusively vegan feature amazing vegan dishes beyond standard veggie burgers and salads! The waitstaff and owner were also really sweet, which is always wonderful. I highly recommend checking out Linger if you’re in the Denver metro area.

It was a truly delicious meal with uncommonly kind and generous vegan rockstars–I can’t believe how much Mike and Dan of The Gay Vegans do for human- and non-human animals, and Courtney and I were so grateful that they took us to this lovely spot as a great introduction to Colorado. I highly suggest checking out Dan and Mike’s blog if you haven’t yet (aka you’ve been living under a rock!) Also, you can read more about causes The Gay Vegans are involved in and care about here.

Incredible butternut squash salad at Linger in Denver with The Gay Vegans Such a treat!

Incredible butternut squash salad at Linger in Denver with The Gay Vegans Such a treat!

Inventive and delicious falafel merged with carrot and spices and a rediculous vegan yoghurt sauce at Linger in Denver!

Inventive and delicious falafel merged with carrot and spices and a ridiculous vegan yoghurt sauce at Linger in Denver!

Chocolate peanut butter cup genius at Linger with The Gay Vegans and Courtney Pool!

Chocolate peanut butter cup genius at Linger with The Gay Vegans and Courtney Pool!

The gorgeous, kind, compassionate, charming and fabulous gay vegans!

Gorgeous, kind, compassionate, charming and fabulous Dan and Mike from The Gay Vegans!

A nice shot of Linger in Denver, CO. Photo via Gridskipper.com

A nice shot of Linger in Denver, CO. Photo via Gridskipper.com

I am so grateful to be settling into life in Boulder, CO after a bit of a rocky start! I look forward to sharing more news and photos from the Front Range! In other news, I’m proud to say Queer Vegan Food was recently featured as a top “Gay Foodie” blog on The Huffington Post! Check it out!

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Gone Home is a new indie story exploration video game.

Gone Home is an indie story exploration video game.

I recently played and beat the new independent video game Gone Home. Set in the 1990s, Gone Home is a story exploration game centering on a young woman who returns home from a year in Europe to find her entire family missing. Sifting through letters, stories, and other artifacts at the house, we learn all about the family and get to solve the mystery of where everybody has gone.

Jane McGonigal, a prominent scholar, author and game expert, has spoken a lot about the potential  for games to make our world a better place. I don’t game very much (ahh, life…how it gets in the way!) but I do strongly believe that games have the potential to offer many benefits both from personal and cultural standpoints.

Gone Home is indeed a remarkable game that offers a truly immersive, empowering and meaningful gameplay experience. Unconventional to the core, it leads with a strong queer narrative and has remarkably gotten mainstream attention and tons of accolades from diverse critics. There’s no guns, no blood, no violence, no scary zombies (maybe a ghost…that’s all I’m sayin’…). There’s just a really sweet queer coming of age tale, a family drama, and tons of awesome 90s relics and riot grrl music.

If this sounds at all intriguing, I highly suggest buying and playing Gone Home and supporting the indie developers who made it (The Fulbright Company), as well as that little part of your heart that’s aching for a truly unique interactive storytelling experience.

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Never Read The Comments On Queer Vegan Food

The infamous “Never Read The Comments” tote bag guest poster Jamie J. Hagen spotted after Vida Vegan Con this year.

Today, Queer Vegan Food readers are in for a major treat: a really amazing guest post by writer/activist and scholar Jamie J. Hagen. I’ve long been a fan of Jamie’s writing and strong feminist-vegan social media presence, and am SO excited that she volunteered to share this personal and important post about the feminist implications of comment sections on online articles and blogs.

Jamie’s discussion is drawn from her experience as an editor of queer lady site  Autostraddle, and other sites. As a speaker at Vida Vegan Con this year, Jamie led a discussion about how to keep comments sections respectful AND maintain healthy discourse. It’s got my wheels spinning; How do online communities enforce respectful commenting while simultaneously encouraging healthy debate?

I’d love to hear what others think about the comments sections in blogs and whether you think Jamie is right that feminist spaces can benefit from a well-enforced comments policy. Her great questions allow us to consider our own experiences with comments sections, and I’d encourage anyone who feels moved to share to do so.

And now, the post you’ve been waiting for… ~ Sarah

Why I Read The Comments: A Feminist Argument For The Value Of An Engaged Comment Community

By: Jamie J. Hagen

As a freelance writer I’ve received incredibly adamant advice to read the comments. I’ve also received incredibly adamant advice not to read the comments. The worth in responding to comments is a somewhat contentious and confused topic, often overshadowing the potential value of an engaged comment community.

During my time as a Contributing Editor to the girl-on-girl culture website Autostraddle I became a big fan of the potential for conversation and community in the comment space. As a regular writer and reader of the website, I value Autostraddle’s efforts to promote a “safe-space” conversation with a well thought out comment policy.

Their comment policy begins, “We have really funny readers, and we love getting to know you and hearing your opinions. Dialogue with readers is so important to us, in fact, that we are working hard to make sure that Autostraddle remains a safe place for discussion as we get bigger and better.”

Covered in their policy are issues such as bad faith, fat phobia, and trans* inclusion and this has led to many constructive, fun, lively conversations moderated by Autostraddle community moderators. Further vegan, queer food for thought: Some of the members of Autostraddle’s comment community became best friends and even lovers during Autostraddle sponsored events and other offline venues. Some readers aren’t out as queer anywhere but online. Some readers don’t find support for their thoughts and feelings as queers anywhere but on online. Knowing the editors, writers and the comment community are all invested in creating a space to support queer readers who may not find that type of support anywhere else is constantly lauded by many community members.

When writing for other websites I seek to bring this same ethic in responding to the comments. For example, while writing for PolicyMic.com it was made clear that promoting our pieces by engaging with the commenters was encouraged, essentially required, to be a successful writer for the site geared towards a millennial crowd working to create a bi-partisan political dialogue.

From the perspective of someone who has been involved in Autostraddle and other feminist comment spaces I pitched the “Comments Are Your Friend” workshop for the vegan blogging conference Vida Vegan Con II conference in May of this year. As I imagined the workshop, it would offer a space to create a conversation about whether people read the comments, why or why not, and how we can make sure we participate in self-care when writing and commenting about the personal as political. Only after learning I’d be welcomed to host the comment conversation at Vida Vegan Con II did I discover the “Never Read the Comments” tote for sale at Portland‘s vegan grocery story Food Fight – so there‘s that!

At the workshop I opened the conversation for all to share their experiences with comments. Many attendees spoke to the difficulty of discussing vegan politics on personal spaces such as Facebook, but agreed there was a valuable opportunity to educate readers on the web about veganism by simply responding with a non-judgmental factual comment when possible. Attempting to change the minds of those trolling websites to get a rise out of writers certainly seems a fools errand, but a well-articulated comment left in response to a nasty or confrontational comment may reach dozens or even hundreds of readers.

Jamie Hagen and Laura Beck of Vegansaurus and Jezebel At Vida Vegan Con Conference

Jamie Hagen, Laura Beck of Vegansaurus and Jezebel and panel participants at Vida Vegan Con Conference

It’s hard to ignore the impact of gender-based and homophobic attacks endured by female and queer writers online. The recent campaigns by Facebook and Twitter to address violent and repetitive rape threats and the posting of rape videos on their networks speaks to the extent of the problem. Because of this reality, I feel those of us with the ability to build and structure a more feminist space in a blog’s comment community should consider and explore taking the time to do so.

Writing about queer politics, vegan politics or any other ethically charged topic can lead to some difficult and exhausting conversations. Creating a valuable comment space requires work, a well-developed comment policy and the ability to enforce it.  Whether a writer chooses to read or engage with the comment community will vary on context, time commitment to community building and meeting the needs of her own self-care.

Do you have experience engaging with constructive conversation in your comment space? If not, do you think a comment policy and more active engagement from regular readers and writers could shift the tone of a comment space?

Jamie Hagen

Jamie J. Hagen is a writer and doctoral student of Global Governance and Human Security at the University of Massachusetts, Boston with a focus on gender and feminist security studies. As a freelance writer Hagen has covered queer and vegan politics, news, and culture for publications such as RollingStone.com, One Green Planet and Autostraddle

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The book Defiant Daughters: 21 Women on Art, Activism, Animals, and The Sexual Politics of Meat, to which I contributed an essay, was published this month. Centered around the work of one of my all-time favorite authors and thinkers, feminist animal rights scholar Carol J. Adams, this collection of 21 essays by diverse women celebrates the legacy of Adams’ book The Sexual Politics of Meat and discusses new perspectives on these topics.

Writing my essay for the anthology was an incredible and challenging experience. It enabled me to reflect on the history of my personal coming out, including times that felt confusing, difficult and only sometimes hopeful. Being completely open about my sexual orientation has been a challenge at times and I’ve struggled with closeting myself in scenarios I discuss in my piece. Writing about coming out as vegan and LGBTQ for the book felt like another coming out. As many of us know, coming out is a lifelong process. Coming out in this essay was a gift and a powerful experience for which I am grateful.

In honor of the launch, various contributors, folks at Lantern Books, and Carol J. Adams hosted readings and events across the United States. Due to several happy coincidences, I was able to attend three of the readings/events to celebrate Defiant Daughters: a reading at The Last Bookstore in LA, attended by my brother Asher–the subject of my essay; a party at Mooshoes in New York, attended by some awesome New Yorkers and Carol J. Adams herself; and a reading at The Wooden Shoe anarchist bookstore in my current hometown Philadelphia, attended by a childhood friend and some rad Philadelphia vegan Twitter friends.

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That’s me with my brother Asher at the Defiant Daughters reading at The Last Bookstore in LA.

The thing is, while I had written about personal sexuality topics before, I had never read my work to crowds in-person prior to these readings, and this experience was scary for me. I have found that it is a lot easier to hide behind a byline or podcast interview than stare into the face of a crowd and speak openly.

Though I’ve said the words “I’m a lesbian vegan” so many times in writings and podcasts and to my nearests and dearests, reading them to strangers and loved ones aloud, in-person at the various Defiant Daughters events felt surprisingly vulnerable and scary. Everything about the readings was exciting and terrifying, like getting swept up by a gust of wind and falling in love and suddenly realizing I forgot to wear pants all at once.

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Contributors to the anthology Defiant Daughters: 21 Women on Art, Activism, Animals and The Sexual Politics of Meat

Seeing my fellow contributors looking dapper and speaking with confidence, I mistakenly assumed that I was the only one who felt so nervous about reading (I’ve since spoken with fellow contributors and we’ve realized we’re not alone in having felt nervous!) Since there were so many of us who contributed to this anthology, we never got to have a “team huddle” so to speak, save for mass e-mails of encouragement from Lantern editor Kara Davis. This morning while listening to contributor Jasmin Singer’s take on the launch on the Our Hen House podcast this week (Note: all proceeds from the book go to the invaluable work of OHH, yet another reason to order your copy if you haven’t already done so!) including a discussion about how nervous she was before this reading, I realized that even those who seem completely outwardly confident can feel butterflies when it comes to public speaking on tough personal topics.

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Carol J. Adams, author of numerous books including The Sexual Politics of Meat speaks at Bluestockings Bookstore in NYC.

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Mooshoes Defiant Daughters launch party sandwich board advertisement.

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That’s me, reading my essay “Brother Knows Best” at The Last Bookstore in LA–in front of my brother!

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Defiant Daughters Contributor Jasmin Singer at Bluestockings Bookstore in NYC.

Anyone who’s listened to Jasmin speak over the past decade at myriad vegan events or who has heard her on her podcast knows she seems at home in front of an audience. This is why I found it so powerful and brave for Jasmin to admit that she also felt so vulnerable reading her essay, which touches on some of the same coming out themes as mine.

I am definitely a beginner when it comes to performing in public, and feel much more comfortable hiding behind a podcast or the written word. Sharing our personal truths in front of a group of people–strangers or otherwise– is intense. Public speaking expert Josh Pais did a great video interview with his B-school mogul wife Marie Forleo on how to overcome fear of public speaking. Pais described the “rush” of energy that we feel before we get in front of a crowd as part of the excitement and energy inherent to delivering our truths to a crowd. Pais’ advice–to let ourselves feel our fear and emotion fully to allow it to pass naturally–has been helpful for me in the three speaking events I’ve done for this book.

In a way, publishing with so many wonderful women has been the most humbling experience. Many accomplished speakers, activists,  PhD candidates, artists and writers are among those who grace Defiant Daughters‘ pages. In my rush to appear like an “author,” I felt shame that I wasn’t already comfortable in my skin in front of a crowd like so many of the other contributors. I shuddered at a lot of the pictures and videos of myself from the events. I felt body image issues come up when I saw unflattering images of myself, mouth agape while speaking, and cringed when I saw myself on video. I’m afraid I’m not as suave as I’d have hoped, but I’m learning to sit with the discomfort of these feelings. They are my own issues to move through, of course, and I didn’t realize how much I still have to work on in the public speaking, body image and self-love departments. This realization of what I still need to learn is one of my biggest blessings of this work.

Though I blog at Queer Vegan Food and am out to everyone I know, coming out to new people does at times still feel intense for me. What this experience of being involved with Defiant Daughters has taught me is where I am as well as where I want to be. I want to be able to overcome my shyness so that my work can focus on helping human- and non-human animals. I am committed to overcoming my personal insecurities around being visible in order to be a more effective voice for the voiceless.

Have you ever felt nervous about speaking in public, or coming out in any context? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

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I did a fun interview with the wonderful Vance Lehmkuhl of VegCast. We chatted about veganism, Philly, and The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook.

Mentions: Defiant Daughters Carol Adams Ashley Maier Food Empowerment Project lauren Ornelas Hip City Veg Vedge Restaurant Nicole Marquis and more . . .

Listen: http://www.vegcast.com/vegcast114.mp3

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Sarah Brown-Queer Vegan Food-E Book Cover-r4-01

About a year ago, I dreamed of creating a charity cookbook project to benefit Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, NY. I absolutely LOVE Woodstock, and am in awe of how much they do to help better the lives of non-human (and human!) animals. My vision for the cookbook was to assemble the weirdest, most unique, and delicious recipes from top vegan chefs, bloggers and authors around the world and sell this collection to benefit the sanctuary and donate 100% of proceeds to go towards helping the animals. Today, my dream has come true! 

Introducing . . .The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

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The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook features recipes that do not use animal products of any kind and are truly queer in an effort to expand the vegan culinary canon beyond traditional vegan cuisine, which tends to imitate the non-vegan food world (vegan ice cream, hot dogs, hamburgers, fake meat, mac n’ cheese, etc.) Recipe contributors include: Carol J. Adams, Gena Hamshaw, Rory Freedman, Jason Allen, Allyson Kramer, Christy Morgan, Mish Wish, JL Fields, Lisa Pitman, Courtney Pool, Rande McDaniel, Marlie Centawer, Erika Reir, Eric Levinson, Mariano Caino, Sara Jane Kurpeski, Rochelle Koivunen, Jason Das, Joan L. Brown (my mom!), Stephanie Austin, Heather Pace, Kelly Peloza, Mark Hawthorne, Rachel Lee, Alessandra Seiter, Lee Khatchadourian-Reese, and Heidi George. All recipes were generously donated by these beloved vegan chefs and bloggers to help the animals!

The most delicious part of this culinary assemblage is that 100% of proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

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A beautiful creature gets the love and respect deserved at Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary!

$15

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Check out some of the recipes featured in The Queer Vegan Food ECookbook!

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Pau d'Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Pau d’Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Buy The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

$15

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All proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

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Thank you, and I look forward to hearing how you love the recipes! – Sarah ;)

[Note: The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook is currently available as an E-book PDF, which is sent to your Inbox immediately after you order.]

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