Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘vegan’

 

Vassar Quarterly Spring/Summer issue Volume 110 on Queer Vegan Food

The spring/summer issue of The Vassar Quarterly features vegetarian perspectives.

Last summer, I wrote a long post about my alma mater’s disappointing “Eat” issue of the alumni/ae quarterly. I was pretty sad to see that my college’s long feature on how we eat featured none of the amazing work current students, staff, professors and alums do in the world of ethical, compassionate eating.

After the post ran, I could not have imagined a better response: other Vassar students, faculty, and alums felt similarly disappointed, and the editor of the magazine wrote to me saying that she would be very interested in remedying the omission of vegan/vegetarian perspectives from representatives of the college. From there, the brilliant students of VARC and other on-campus groups worked with the editor to create a beautiful feature for the current issue (spring/summer, vol. 110) that highlights some of the amazing work being done by Vassarians in the field of animal activism! You can read it online in full here.

vassarsarahcloseup

The issue features alumni/ae Pulin ModiSusan Prolman, yours truly, Nicky Quinn and student activists Allen Darer, Alessandra Seiter, Kaden Maguire, and Rocky Schwartz.

Wonderful activist Rocky Schwartz at Animal Place in Vassar's feature on vegetarianism at Vassar and beyond.

Wonderful activist Rocky Schwartz at Animal Place in a feature on vegetarianism at Vassar and beyond.

The piece features some great quotations about vegetarianism, reported by writer Sara Sezun:

On the scale of factory farming:

“According to the Humane Society, of the approximately 11 billion livestock animals killed annually in the United States, 86 percent are chickens and turkeys raised on factory farms.” (p. 20)

On meat eating’s impact on the environment:

“Animal agriculture produces 18 to 50 percent of greenhouse gases.” – James McWilliams. (p. 20).

On the “humane meat” myth:

“Free-range animals face similar fates (as those raised on factory farms). Farmers who raise them cannot allow their herds to become too large, because overgrazing would ruin their pastures. Therefore, “excess” calves, for example, may be sold to feedlots to be raised under conventional circumstances.” (p. 20)

Alan Darer, a current Vassar student whose work inspires me constantly, eloquently posted on his Facebook page about the Quarterly issue and his and other students’ activism around it:

“Alessandra and I were on the phone with (editor) Liz to see how we could move forward. She was very kind, receptive, admitted that they had made a mistake by omitting a vegetarian/vegan perspective and was eager to correct this. She suggested that they publish two letters to the editor critiquing this omission in the Fall Issue and then publish a full feature article on VARC in the Winter Issue.

What’s my takeaway? As animal advocates, our number one job is to be a voice for animals as best as we can and create opportunities to help share their stories. By staying solutions-oriented, we were able to work with Liz to share the plight of farmed animals and VARC’s amazing work with the alumni of Vassar College.” – Alan Darer

vassarsecondspread

After this issue went live, I heard from friends and family who were inspired by the info and statistics included, all of which help bring awareness to the growing movement of veganism and compassionate eating into the mainstream. I’m also delighted that some of my recipes are featured on the college’s website!

I have never been prouder to be a Vassar alum, and am so grateful for the network of animal activism on campus and beyond! Congrats to all involved in making this issue happen, and to the animals whose lives will be saved thanks to the efforts of those featured.

Read Full Post »

Hampton Creek Foods Just Mayo, Eat The Dough and Chipotle Mayo. Photo via Vegansaurus!/Megan Adamson-Jackes.

Hampton Creek Foods Just Mayo, Eat The Dough and Chipotle Mayo. Photo via Vegansaurus!

I’m told that back in the day, we plant eaters had to make our own veggie burgers and milk our own nut milks. Now, if we want to make our own veggie burgers and strain soaked almonds through our nut milk bags, so be it–but we have choices. These choices allow us to be lazy vegans if we want to, but they also allow for people with tons of expertise (aka food scientists or professional chefs) to develop and refine ingredient combinations that the average vegan just doesn’t have time for.

Of course I think it’s wonderful to enjoy a whole foods, plant-based diet, but I think it’s a huge step in the right direction that we vegans can be lazy if we so choose, and are able to pick up packaged vegan foods as easily as omnivores. In the past, vegans wanting legit-tasting, cruelty-free mayo had to enjoy Veganaise (which isn’t bad, but isn’t great either) or make their own from scratch. Now, we have Just Mayo by Hampton Creek Foods, which offers a superior-tasting vegan mayonnaise that really behaves like it should–thick, creamy, slightly tangy and easily spreadable. Hampton Creek Foods’ team of very talented food chefs and scientists were no doubt involved in its creation! Learn more about the development process on Our Hen House’s podcast featuring Hampton Creek Foods CEO Josh Tetrick.

Silver Hills Bakery gluten-free vegan bread and Just Mayo: A perfect sandwich combination.

Silver Hills Bakery gluten-free vegan bread and Just Mayo: A perfect sandwich combination.

I tried Hampton Creek Foods mayo on Silver Hills gluten-free vegan sandwich bread. It went so well with the avocado, tempeh and tomato fillings! I also love that Hampton Creek Foods is getting national attention. You can check out just a bit of the press they’re getting here, here and here. Oh, and did I mention Bill Gates is one of their investors? You KNOW this company is going places. Perhaps what I love the most about Hampton Creek Foods products is that their target demographic actually isn’t us vegans–it’s omnivores, and their smart marketing campaigns use verbiage that make it very easy to see a new possibility for the millions of chickens who are abused, enslaved, and lose their lives in order to create mayonnaise for someone. This is a very promising path to the future, indeed.

Hampton Creek Foods also sent their Chipotle Mayo (which was not my bag but I could see others loving it) and their “Eat The Dough” gluten-free vegan cookie dough. Absolutely awesome cookie dough, I can’t wait to grab some in stores at some point.

Connect with Hampton Creek foods on Facebook to stay updated on the latest news and to find out when they’re selling in a store near you.

Read Full Post »

IMG_1394

I recently had the pleasure of visiting Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary in Deer Trail, CO with my love Courtney. Approximately 1.5 hours drive from Boulder, Peaceful Prairie provides a safe, loving home to rescued farm animals. Having hit upon hard times–their main well and cisterns froze and broke in the recent cold spell–Peaceful Prairie is currently doing a fundraising campaign to get back on their feet. During the tour, we learned that they’re slowly recovering (though they definitely still need help!) and it was an honor and a privilege to get to meet some of the human volunteers who run the sanctuary, as well as some of the gorgeous non-human animals who make the sanctuary their home.

Here are some pictures of the non-human friends we had the pleasure of meeting at Peaceful Prairie:

Beautiful cows at Peaceful Prairie in Deer Trail, CO.

Beautiful cows at Peaceful Prairie in Deer Trail, CO

Courtney cuddling a cow.

Courtney cuddling a cow.

A beautiful pig. Photo by Josh Valentine.

A beautiful pig

Lovely fowl at Peaceful Prairie. Photo by Josh Valentine.

Lovely fowl at Peaceful Prairie

A banana-loving pig at Peaceful Prairie.

A banana-loving pig at Peaceful Prairie.

Justice the cow stole my heart! What a sweetie.

Justice the cow stole my heart! What a sweetie.

There I am, explaining to a goat that I am a vegan.

There I am, explaining to a goat that I am a vegan.

With Courtney at Peaceful Prairie sanctuary.

With Courtney at Peaceful Prairie sanctuary.

A lovely bovine friend at Peaceful Prairie. Photo by Josh Valentine.

A lovely bovine friend at Peaceful Prairie.

Whole Foods donates expired produce to Peaceful Prairie. The animals love it!

Whole Foods donates expired produce to Peaceful Prairie. The animals love it!

Lots of great goats at Peaceful Prairie.

Lots of great goats at Peaceful Prairie.

A goat friend at Peaceful Prairie.

A goat friend at Peaceful Prairie.

The crew at Peaceful Prairie.

Some of the crew at Peaceful Prairie.

Courtney and a new friend at Peaceful Prairie.

Courtney and a new friend at Peaceful Prairie.

During the tour, I heard the story of a lovely goat who was rescued a few weeks ago by the sanctuary. Originally “owned” by an organic, “feel-good” goat dairy farm, this goat was only a few years old but had already had 6 kids (all of whom were stolen from her) and was “spent”–meaning she could no longer produce milk that could be commodified by humans.

At the time of rescue, she had a severe eye infection and parasites that were left untreated because–now here’s what’s so important to convey–organic farms aren’t allowed to use antibiotics to treat their animals.

This is a horrible reality that must be shared with vegetarians and omnivores who purchase and consume cow or goat dairy from these so-called “feel-good” organic farms as an alternative to animal products from factory farms. There’s nothing “feel-good” about them for the animals who suffer. I am grateful this goat was rescued and to be able to pass on this crucial info.

Sanctuaries like Peaceful Prairie are a fantastic and important reminder to me of why I am vegan–seeing rescued animals always motivates to try harder and do more for the animals. Eating a vegan diet and telling others about being vegan are important steps, but there’s always so much more we can do. Interacting with the non-human animals for whom I choose this delicious, easy, and extremely rewarding lifestyle known as veganism is such a pleasure.

I look forward to returning to the sanctuary at some point in the not-too-distant future and wish Peaceful Prairie continued success with their fundraiser. You can learn more about Peaceful Prairie and donate to their fundraiser here.

Read Full Post »

Linger in Denver

Linger in Denver, CO

Last night was a superb one–not only did Courtney and I move back into our apartment after three weeks away (it was being repaired post-Boulder flood)–but we were also treated to a magical vegan dinner at Linger in Denver, CO with fabulous new friends The Gay Vegans!

I have admired Dan and Mike of The Gay Vegans from afar for a long time, so it was such a treat to get to meet them! I so admire their compassionate approach to vegan activism; kinder, more caring and passionate vegan activists I’ve never found. These guys are also smart, witty, and charming, and Courtney and I had a lovely time trying out one of their favorite vegan-friendly restaurants, Linger. The Gay Vegans have written about Linger before on their fabulous blog, which you can check out here.

Starting with sweet potato waffle fries and a sweet dipping sauce, we elected to split dishes including a delightful seasonal butternut squash salad, dosas, and a unique carrot falafel dish that came with a smoky, cheesy-like sauce. Heavenly! We also enjoyed some incredibly prepared watermelon appetizers with sugared spicy topping.

For dessert, after laughing and sharing stories and getting to know the people behind the blogs (!), we enjoyed tangerine sorbet and a melt-in-your-mouth homemade peanut butter cup dish that kicked store-bought versions to the curb. Linger has a to-live-for location with a great view of Downtown Denver and a sweet rooftop bar. Linger isn’t a vegan restaurant, but they do right by vegan gourmands! I really love when restaurants that aren’t exclusively vegan feature amazing vegan dishes beyond standard veggie burgers and salads! The waitstaff and owner were also really sweet, which is always wonderful. I highly recommend checking out Linger if you’re in the Denver metro area.

It was a truly delicious meal with uncommonly kind and generous vegan rockstars–I can’t believe how much Mike and Dan of The Gay Vegans do for human- and non-human animals, and Courtney and I were so grateful that they took us to this lovely spot as a great introduction to Colorado. I highly suggest checking out Dan and Mike’s blog if you haven’t yet (aka you’ve been living under a rock!) Also, you can read more about causes The Gay Vegans are involved in and care about here.

Incredible butternut squash salad at Linger in Denver with The Gay Vegans Such a treat!

Incredible butternut squash salad at Linger in Denver with The Gay Vegans Such a treat!

Inventive and delicious falafel merged with carrot and spices and a rediculous vegan yoghurt sauce at Linger in Denver!

Inventive and delicious falafel merged with carrot and spices and a ridiculous vegan yoghurt sauce at Linger in Denver!

Chocolate peanut butter cup genius at Linger with The Gay Vegans and Courtney Pool!

Chocolate peanut butter cup genius at Linger with The Gay Vegans and Courtney Pool!

The gorgeous, kind, compassionate, charming and fabulous gay vegans!

Gorgeous, kind, compassionate, charming and fabulous Dan and Mike from The Gay Vegans!

A nice shot of Linger in Denver, CO. Photo via Gridskipper.com

A nice shot of Linger in Denver, CO. Photo via Gridskipper.com

Today, Courtney and I are moving furniture and unpacking with our wonderful new vegan friend Josh Valentine, who blogs at JoshValentine.Net. I am so grateful to be settling into life in Boulder, CO after a bit of a rocky start! I look forward to sharing more news and photos from the Front Range! In other news, I’m proud to say Queer Vegan Food was recently featured as a top “Gay Foodie” blog on The Huffington Post! Check it out!

Read Full Post »

Yesterday, I accidentally ate non-vegan hummus.

Yesterday, I accidentally ate non-vegan hummus.

Yesterday, I accidentally ingested dairy in the form of milk hidden in the ingredient list in organic “classic” -flavored hummus sent to me by Eat Well Enjoy Life, a company that wanted me to review various flavors from their line of hummus.

I specifically asked Eat Well Enjoy Life to send only vegan flavors, and so I didn’t even think to check the ingredients of what they sent me. It turns out, they make a lot of vegan flavors, and only a few are made with dairy. I was randomly scanning the ingredients this morning when I saw “contains milk” and my heart sunk. It turns out that in addition to all-vegan hummuses (which are amazing, and are made with really unique vegan ingredients like lentils, white beans, and black beans!), they also sell Greek-yogurt infused hummus. Bummer to the max.

The vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life

The actually vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life. They are great.

The non-vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life. They are made with Greek Yogurt, which wasn't so obvious from the packaging.

The non-vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life. They are made with Greek Yogurt, which wasn’t so obvious from the packaging.

I haven’t accidentally eaten animal products (that I know of) in a long time, and each time it happens (it’s been only a few times during the 8+ years I’ve been vegan) it’s challenging for me on many levels. I figured I can’t be the only one who has gone through this, so I decided to share what I’ve learned from my recent experience.

Here are the 5 Things I learned From Accidentally Eating Animal Products:

1) Our world is not as vegan as I sometimes wish it were. Weird uses of dairy/eggs/etc. still exist in things one would suspect would be vegan, but you can’t be too careful and it’s always a good idea to double check when trying new products.

2) Companies may claim to understand what veganism is and seem enthusiastic about veganism, but that doesn’t mean they don’t make mistakes. I’ve even seen things labeled vegan that list whey, honey, dairy, and eggs in products’ ingredients. It’s always a good idea to check, educate, and have conversations to really ensure products being received or reviewed are vegan, especially as a food blogger who gets to interact with sales and marketing people on the reg. I think in this case, there was just a miscommunication between the person with whom I interacted and whomever sent out the samples for review. Eat Well Enjoy Life’s vegan hummus flavors are indeed delicious–creamy, spicy, white bean hummus and edamame hummus, and other bean formulations are indeed worthy of telling vegan bloggers about–it’s just a shame they accidentally sent non-vegan samples that I didn’t think to check as well.

3) It’s best to make your own hummus. No matter how great a store-bought hummus, nothing compares to homemade versions. Homemade hummus tastes way fresher and better, I’ve learned. I highly recommend any of the hummus recipes on Choosing Raw.

4) I am human, and sometimes humans forget to check product labels even when they know better. We live in a non-vegan world and this is just another reminder that we all need to do our best to keep educating and helping people understand why we choose to abstain from consuming animal products.

5) Good can come from bad. Today, in honor of my unfortunate accidental ingestion of dairy, I’m going to make a donation to an animal welfare-related cause. I’ve decided to give to Veganism is the Next Evolution (VINE). VINE is a wonderful sanctuary and I highly recommend checking them out. I realize it is a privilege to be able to donate, and my accidental ingestion of animal products is a great excuse for me to put extra attention into doing what I can. (Not that one needs to wait until they accidentally eat animal products to promote animal welfare causes!)

Thanks for reading! xo

I’d love to hear about others’ experiences dealing with this, if anyone has a story related or wants to share?

Read Full Post »

As I sit here on a plush mauve couch in a stranger’s warm, well-lit living room drinking fair trade organic French Press coffee with soymilk and stevia, typing away on my computer, I feel really, really grateful, lucky and blessed.

If you’ve been checking the news lately, you have probably heard that Boulder and other parts of Colorado were recently hit damn hard by a historic flood. 

I moved to Boulder a few weeks ago. I wrote a post about it. Courtney and I had just moved into our new apartment four days before the floods hit.

At about 2:30am on Thursday, I awoke to Courtney telling me water was coming up through the floor (we chose a first-floor apartment–oops!) and that we needed to take action. The flood definitely came by surprise.

We have a really sweet landlord who coached us through the necessary steps to leaving the place–putting as much of our stuff as we could up on shelves and on top of the fridge and kitchen cabinets, turning off the power fuse box to avoid electrical issues, putting down towels wherever we could. Twitter confirmed roads were closed and there wasn’t a possibility to go anywhere outside of our building during the storm, so we brought our sleeping bags and blankets to the third floor of our unit and texted with friends in the area to see if they were out of harm’s way, and prayed for those were were vulnerable to the storm. We snapped a selfie to commemorate the crazy evening (look–we’re the Instagram generation!) and then tried to get some sleep in the hallway.

Flood evacuation selfie: 2:30a

Flood evacuation selfie: 2:30a

After some half-sleep, we were rescued by our landlord’s friend, a nurse who showed up in his shining black Subaru while there was a bit of a break in the rain. He took us to a nice home a few blocks away owned by a mutual friend of theirs, which also became home to other flood refugees. I am grateful for their kindness and generosity.

I checked the news and contacted friends and started getting a sense of the true devastation of the flood. Towns and homes destroyed. Our apartment was wrecked by the flood water, but thankfully we were able to grab our laptops, passports, a change of clothes and some rations. Nothing was destroyed that can’t be replaced.

I have to give a big shout-out to Tasty Bite, who miraculously sent me samples of their products to review right before the storm hit. I grabbed some of the yellow bags quickly on my way out, and have been so glad I did! Lots of delicious, easy-to-prepare quick meals have really helped out in a pinch. Tasty Bite will be my new go-to camping or emergency food supply, for sure. It tastes great and doesn’t even require cooking, though I have heated it up and served it with fresh greens.

Best flood food ever.

Tasty Bite is the best flood food ever.

The past few days have meant rebuilding in many senses. Courtney and I have since gone over to our apartment and pulled out soaked drywall, cabinets, and baseboards. Our landlord brought a crew of folks to get started on the construction, and has been amazing in every sense, working quickly to help us get back into our apartment–cross your fingers it’ll hopefully be next week.

Boulder and nearby towns are wrecked–roads destroyed, paths muddied, homes ruined–but there is a sense of resiliency as volunteer crews have already formed to help people and animals cope with the storm’s wake.

It’s been humbling to think of how many have been hurt by this storm. Boulder Pride was slated to happen today, and I agree with the organizer’s decision to postpone it. Now is not the time to party; it’s the time to restore, help out, and rebuild.

As I work remotely, I’ve been able to get some work done amidst this flood chaos, and have been touched by the kindness of the clients with whom I work who have witnessed this from afar.

The muddy Goose Creek path in Boulder, CO.

The muddy Goose Creek path in Boulder, CO.

The Goose Creek Greenway trail filled with mud after the flood.

The Goose Creek Greenway trail filled with mud after the flood.

The Boulder waterways are muddy and in need of repair after the flood.

The Boulder waterways are muddy and in need of repair after the flood.

The iconic flatirons enshrouded in clouds the morning after the flood.

The iconic flatirons enshrouded in clouds the morning after the flood.

A lot of places in Boulder have opened up again, including gyms, Whole Foods, and other local businesses. Life goes on. There is a lot of work to be done to repair what the flood has done to this city and its people, but it’s heartening to see some things springing back to life.

I have been blessed and lucky to be safe and to have been helped out by some truly kind and lovely folks, as well as to have such amazing friends and family who have checked on us and offered love and support from a distance. Thank you, sincerely–it means the world to me.

I hope to post more updates as things progress. Thanks again for all of your love and support, and for reading. xo

Read Full Post »

Alas, blog friends, I haven’t written a personal post in ages. This update is long overdue! The big news in my life these days is that Courtney and I recently moved to Boulder, Colorado! We both work remotely and have flexibility with where we live (a major privilege, to be sure) and decided to move our life to the Rockies.

I’ve never lived in Colorado before, and I’d only visited Boulder a handful of times  before moving here, so it’s definitely been an all-new adventure!

So far, I’ve met some awesome new friends and gone on tons of hikes. And eaten some really yummy vegan foods!  Leaf Vegetarian is delightful; Native Foods has an outpost here, and the Farmer’s Market is brilliant. The Ethiopian restaurant Ras Kassa’s has tons of vegan and gluten-free vegan options, and there are a bevy of other places I’ve yet to check out that I’ve heard are amazing.

12b9a2b4060611e3a0b722000ae911ee_7

Courtney hiking in the Anemone trail in Boulder, CO!

515b63f4fe1311e281c522000a9e035f_7

A view of the Flatirons from North Boulder

33e40c82037111e3b5c422000a1f9a53_7

Yummy boba aka bubble tea at Ku Cha House of Tea in Boulder, CO

a94d7608045611e3ad2322000a1fbfb7_7-1

Vegan kale chips and hummus at The Kitchen Next Door in Boulder, CO!

b1c396a20ce711e3a74822000a9e2993_7

Fresh beets at the Boulder Farmers’ Market!

660e253a0cea11e3951522000a1f99d1_7

Organic sunflowers at the downtown Boulder Farmers’ Market!

d346a1240ce811e3829522000a1fa769_7

Fresh green juice from Pressery sold at the Boulder Farmer’s Market

b9ac10ac055211e3bd9722000ae80ebd_7

Vegan and gluten-free Injera and Ethiopian food at Ras Kassa’s

e0512a5a0a9b11e3b3af22000a1fb856_7

The yummy vegan Taco Salad from Native Foods in Boulder, CO

732b129e0ebd11e3a74822000a9e2993_7

A farm-fresh colorful vegan gluten-free meal I cooked in Boulder, Colorado!

dc86e288fd6311e2aeca22000a9f18e5_7

North Boulder Park in Boulder, CO

e29532de010e11e3838b22000ae81190_7

A beautiful hike in Boulder, CO

Thanks for reading and checking out my pictures about my new life in Boulder, Colorado! I hope to continue to post more in the near future!

Read Full Post »

Never Read The Comments On Queer Vegan Food

The infamous “Never Read The Comments” tote bag guest poster Jamie J. Hagen spotted after Vida Vegan Con this year.

Today, Queer Vegan Food readers are in for a major treat: a really amazing guest post by writer/activist and scholar Jamie J. Hagen. I’ve long been a fan of Jamie’s writing and strong feminist-vegan social media presence, and am SO excited that she volunteered to share this personal and important post about the feminist implications of comment sections on online articles and blogs.

Jamie’s discussion is drawn from her experience as an editor of queer lady site  Autostraddle, and other sites. As a speaker at Vida Vegan Con this year, Jamie led a discussion about how to keep comments sections respectful AND maintain healthy discourse. It’s got my wheels spinning; How do online communities enforce respectful commenting while simultaneously encouraging healthy debate?

I’d love to hear what others think about the comments sections in blogs and whether you think Jamie is right that feminist spaces can benefit from a well-enforced comments policy. Her great questions allow us to consider our own experiences with comments sections, and I’d encourage anyone who feels moved to share to do so.

And now, the post you’ve been waiting for… ~ Sarah

Why I Read The Comments: A Feminist Argument For The Value Of An Engaged Comment Community

By: Jamie J. Hagen

As a freelance writer I’ve received incredibly adamant advice to read the comments. I’ve also received incredibly adamant advice not to read the comments. The worth in responding to comments is a somewhat contentious and confused topic, often overshadowing the potential value of an engaged comment community.

During my time as a Contributing Editor to the girl-on-girl culture website Autostraddle I became a big fan of the potential for conversation and community in the comment space. As a regular writer and reader of the website, I value Autostraddle’s efforts to promote a “safe-space” conversation with a well thought out comment policy.

Their comment policy begins, “We have really funny readers, and we love getting to know you and hearing your opinions. Dialogue with readers is so important to us, in fact, that we are working hard to make sure that Autostraddle remains a safe place for discussion as we get bigger and better.”

Covered in their policy are issues such as bad faith, fat phobia, and trans* inclusion and this has led to many constructive, fun, lively conversations moderated by Autostraddle community moderators. Further vegan, queer food for thought: Some of the members of Autostraddle’s comment community became best friends and even lovers during Autostraddle sponsored events and other offline venues. Some readers aren’t out as queer anywhere but online. Some readers don’t find support for their thoughts and feelings as queers anywhere but on online. Knowing the editors, writers and the comment community are all invested in creating a space to support queer readers who may not find that type of support anywhere else is constantly lauded by many community members.

When writing for other websites I seek to bring this same ethic in responding to the comments. For example, while writing for PolicyMic.com it was made clear that promoting our pieces by engaging with the commenters was encouraged, essentially required, to be a successful writer for the site geared towards a millennial crowd working to create a bi-partisan political dialogue.

From the perspective of someone who has been involved in Autostraddle and other feminist comment spaces I pitched the “Comments Are Your Friend” workshop for the vegan blogging conference Vida Vegan Con II conference in May of this year. As I imagined the workshop, it would offer a space to create a conversation about whether people read the comments, why or why not, and how we can make sure we participate in self-care when writing and commenting about the personal as political. Only after learning I’d be welcomed to host the comment conversation at Vida Vegan Con II did I discover the “Never Read the Comments” tote for sale at Portland‘s vegan grocery story Food Fight – so there‘s that!

At the workshop I opened the conversation for all to share their experiences with comments. Many attendees spoke to the difficulty of discussing vegan politics on personal spaces such as Facebook, but agreed there was a valuable opportunity to educate readers on the web about veganism by simply responding with a non-judgmental factual comment when possible. Attempting to change the minds of those trolling websites to get a rise out of writers certainly seems a fools errand, but a well-articulated comment left in response to a nasty or confrontational comment may reach dozens or even hundreds of readers.

Jamie Hagen and Laura Beck of Vegansaurus and Jezebel At Vida Vegan Con Conference

Jamie Hagen, Laura Beck of Vegansaurus and Jezebel and panel participants at Vida Vegan Con Conference

It’s hard to ignore the impact of gender-based and homophobic attacks endured by female and queer writers online. The recent campaigns by Facebook and Twitter to address violent and repetitive rape threats and the posting of rape videos on their networks speaks to the extent of the problem. Because of this reality, I feel those of us with the ability to build and structure a more feminist space in a blog’s comment community should consider and explore taking the time to do so.

Writing about queer politics, vegan politics or any other ethically charged topic can lead to some difficult and exhausting conversations. Creating a valuable comment space requires work, a well-developed comment policy and the ability to enforce it.  Whether a writer chooses to read or engage with the comment community will vary on context, time commitment to community building and meeting the needs of her own self-care.

Do you have experience engaging with constructive conversation in your comment space? If not, do you think a comment policy and more active engagement from regular readers and writers could shift the tone of a comment space?

Jamie Hagen

Jamie J. Hagen is a writer and doctoral student of Global Governance and Human Security at the University of Massachusetts, Boston with a focus on gender and feminist security studies. As a freelance writer Hagen has covered queer and vegan politics, news, and culture for publications such as RollingStone.com, One Green Planet and Autostraddle

Read Full Post »

Animal Camp By Kathy Stevens

While in the process of going vegan, I tore through several vegan-themed books within a couple weeks. Among them: Vegan Freak by Bob and Jenna Torres, Animal Liberation by Peter Singer, Skinny Bitch by Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin, and, of course, The Sexual Politics of Meat by Carol J. Adams, a book which has profoundly changed my life in more ways than I can count (see: Defiant Daughters).

I read these volumes because each offered various insights to aid my transition to veganism. In 2005, the year I went vegan, there weren’t as many resources available online and as an eighteen-year-old, I didn’t know many peers who were vegan. Books provided information, motivation, and a plan for me to eschew animal products as well as arm myself with language to share my transition with others.

As I approach my eight-year vegan anniversary, I’ll admit I’ve really lagged when it comes to reading animal rights books. Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about the purpose of vegan books for already-vegan audiences. The value of vegan cookbooks for vegans is pretty obvious–who isn’t a fan of new recipe collections? But what about animal rights books for those of us who have already committed to fighting animal welfare injustices? I thought that since I didn’t need to watch Meat Your Meat ever again in order to know why I wouldn’t want to use animal products, there may not be a strong need for me to continue to read vegan books post-transition. After all, didn’t I already “know the deal”?

After reading Animal Camp: Reflections On A Decade of Love, Hope and Veganism at Catskill Animal Sanctuary by Kathy Stevens, I’ve realized why it’s still important for longstanding (ish?) vegans like myself to continue to educate ourselves about animal welfare concerns through vegan books and media. Stevens’ book is beautifully written, filled with stories and anecdotes about what life is really like working at Catskill Animal Sanctuary (CAS), and it has helped me see that there’s still so much I can learn as a vegan about animal welfare issues.

Before reading Animal Camp, I had no idea that animal hoarding cases were some of the top sources of abused animals in need of rescue at places like CAS. I believed animal hoarding was rare and properly addressed under our legal system, but the truth is that the problem is much more prevalent in the United States than I could have imagined, and through archaic laws, animal hoarders are often able to get off with probation and nearly always quickly become repeat offenders. Another shocking fact: many hoarders are even able to receive “animal sanctuary” designations to mask their actions. Stevens describes a chilling seizure of abused animals from another so-called animal sanctuary where starving dogs were literally eating lamas alive. Truly awful to read, yes, but even more awful that it goes on. I hope to continue to learn more about animal hoarding so that I can become a more informed animal welfare advocate.

Another amazing aspect of Animal Camp is that it is filled with heartwarming stories that reveal the diversity of personalities and habits of various animal species at CAS without a trace of anthropomorphism. Think stories of chickens nuzzling up to goats, an abused, malnourished horse and a quadruplet of Giardia-ridden baby cows making complete recoveries due to excellent round-the-clock sanctuary care and their remarkable resilience. Stevens reminds us that every animal is an individual, and that the best thing animal advocates can do is truly to go vegan. Worse than animal hoarding (as bad as it is) is the systematic cruelty inherent to animal agriculture industries.

The depth of information and inspiring stories contained in Animal Camp has renewed my vegan spirit. I know it has and will continue to allow me to be a better vegan advocate and continues to inspire me to be a lifelong vegan. I think it would appeal as easily to a non-vegan as a vegan, but am grateful that as a vegan I have had the opportunity to read it. I can’t wait to read another vegan book soon! Grab your copy of Animal Camp here.

Read Full Post »

Sarah Brown-Queer Vegan Food-E Book Cover-r4-01

About a year ago, I dreamed of creating a charity cookbook project to benefit Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, NY. I absolutely LOVE Woodstock, and am in awe of how much they do to help better the lives of non-human (and human!) animals. My vision for the cookbook was to assemble the weirdest, most unique, and delicious recipes from top vegan chefs, bloggers and authors around the world and sell this collection to benefit the sanctuary and donate 100% of proceeds to go towards helping the animals. Today, my dream has come true! 

Introducing . . .The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

Queer Vegan Food-Contributor Collage-r1-02

The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook features recipes that do not use animal products of any kind and are truly queer in an effort to expand the vegan culinary canon beyond traditional vegan cuisine, which tends to imitate the non-vegan food world (vegan ice cream, hot dogs, hamburgers, fake meat, mac n’ cheese, etc.) Recipe contributors include: Carol J. Adams, Gena Hamshaw, Rory Freedman, Jason Allen, Allyson Kramer, Christy Morgan, Mish Wish, JL Fields, Lisa Pitman, Courtney Pool, Rande McDaniel, Marlie Centawer, Erika Reir, Eric Levinson, Mariano Caino, Sara Jane Kurpeski, Rochelle Koivunen, Jason Das, Joan L. Brown (my mom!), Stephanie Austin, Heather Pace, Kelly Peloza, Mark Hawthorne, Rachel Lee, Alessandra Seiter, Lee Khatchadourian-Reese, and Heidi George. All recipes were generously donated by these beloved vegan chefs and bloggers to help the animals!

The most delicious part of this culinary assemblage is that 100% of proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

http://www.yourtimetravels.com/blog/?p=830

A beautiful creature gets the love and respect deserved at Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary!

$15

btn_buynowCC_LG

Check out some of the recipes featured in The Queer Vegan Food ECookbook!

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Pau d'Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Pau d’Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Buy The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

$15

btn_buynowCC_LG

All proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

woodstocklogo

Thank you, and I look forward to hearing how you love the recipes! – Sarah ;)

[Note: The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook is currently available as an E-book PDF, which is sent to your Inbox immediately after you order.]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 524 other followers