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Archive for the ‘vegan’ Category

Mushroom-Coconut Soup

After recently and repeatedly trying the coconut soup at Vientiane Lao-Thai cafe in West Philly, I determined I needed to try my hand in making something similar at home lest the restaurant run out of it on my accord. After picking up a can of light coconut milk from Mariposa Food Co-Op and fistfuls of local kale and 1/2 pound crimini and portobello mushrooms at the Clark Park Farmers’ market, I set to fashioning my version of veggie-filled soup.

The just-blanched crunch of the kale, which I tossed in at the last moment, was delicious paired with the chickpea miso-infused mushrooms, garlic and onions. Paprika is optional, but I loved how it changed the tint of the soup and added smoky flavor notes. This soup honestly does stray from the Vientiane version, and is undoubtedly missing “key” ingredients, but I still think it’s good enough to stand on its own and I entreat you to make it!

Mushroom-Coconut Soup

(Serves 4-6)

Ingredients:

1/2 pound Crimini, portobello, or other mushrooms

1 large onion

1/2 Tbs chickpea miso

3 cloves garlic (more if that’s your thing)

1/2 Tbs coconut oil

1 can light coconut milk

1 tsp Paprika (optional)

4 large carrots

1 bunch kale

1 Tbs red pepper flakes (optional)

Broccoli florets (optional–I didn’t use)

Chickpeas (optional-I didn’t use)

Tofu (optional – I didn’t use)

Instructions:

Chop all produce ingredients. Cook the mushrooms, onions, and garlic in coconut milk, coconut oil and chickpea miso, paprika and red pepper flakes (if using), adding a little bit of water if needed. After 15 minutes on the stovetop, add in the carrots and cook another 3-4 minutes (I like crunchier carrots–feel free to cook longer). Toss in the kale right before serving. Enjoy!

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Greetings, dear readers. I can’t tell you how grateful I am for your outpouring of generosity and support for The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook and Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary. Thank you SO much for helping make this vision a reality, and for helping the animals of Woodstock! I feel so blessed that this project is helping the sanctuary, and am glad to hear that folks are loving the fun, unique and inspiring recipes by the finest vegan chefs, authors and bloggers.

I’ve been hesitant to post since introducing the cookbook (how can you follow that?!) but I’m thrilled today to share a recipe that I’ve been hinting about recently on social media:gluten free vegan chocolate chip cupcakes, which I am pretty sure will totally rock your world. I’ve also been waiting to share this recipe until I was sure I’d gotten it just right, tweaking for texture and sweetness variables.  I think they are really delicious and delightfully chocolatey without being overwhelmingly sweet, but I wanted to get these to the point where even omnivores would love them.

Last night I whipped up a batch for eight dinner party guests, and seeing how quickly and enthusiastically these got gobbled, I can confidently say that the cupcakes are ready to be introduced to the world and perhaps your kitchen some time very soon.

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Gluten Free Vegan Chocolate Chip Cupcakes

Serves 12-14

Ingredients:

Cupcakes

1 1/2 cups gluten free flour

1 cup coconut sugar

1/4 cup sunflower or coconut oil

1/4 cup cocoa powder

1 1/2 tsp baking soda

1/4 cup applesauce

1/2 tsp salt

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

1 cup water

Frosting (optional)

1/2 avocado

6-7 dates

1/2 tsp vanilla

2 tsp cacao powder

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp chia seeds

1/4 cup fair-trade organic chocolate chips for garnish (optional)

1/4 cup water (if making in a Vitamix)

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Paper liner or grease a dozen cupcake/muffin pan. Mix together the dry ingredients and wet ingredients separately. Stir in the liquid to the dry until properly mixed. Add the cupcake batter to tins and bake for 25-28 minutes. Allow cupcakes to cool and, if using frosting, mix all ingredients in a high-powered blender or food processor (I used my Vitamix and it did the trick). Frost and garnish, and serve with a tall cold glass of nut mylk.

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About a year ago, I dreamed of creating a charity cookbook project to benefit Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, NY. I absolutely LOVE Woodstock, and am in awe of how much they do to help better the lives of non-human (and human!) animals. My vision for the cookbook was to assemble the weirdest, most unique, and delicious recipes from top vegan chefs, bloggers and authors around the world and sell this collection to benefit the sanctuary and donate 100% of proceeds to go towards helping the animals. Today, my dream has come true! 

Introducing . . .The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

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The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook features recipes that do not use animal products of any kind and are truly queer in an effort to expand the vegan culinary canon beyond traditional vegan cuisine, which tends to imitate the non-vegan food world (vegan ice cream, hot dogs, hamburgers, fake meat, mac n’ cheese, etc.) Recipe contributors include: Carol J. Adams, Gena Hamshaw, Rory Freedman, Jason Allen, Allyson Kramer, Christy Morgan, Mish Wish, JL Fields, Lisa Pitman, Courtney Pool, Rande McDaniel, Marlie Centawer, Erika Reir, Eric Levinson, Mariano Caino, Sara Jane Kurpeski, Rochelle Koivunen, Jason Das, Joan L. Brown (my mom!), Stephanie Austin, Heather Pace, Kelly Peloza, Mark Hawthorne, Rachel Lee, Alessandra Seiter, Lee Khatchadourian-Reese, and Heidi George. All recipes were generously donated by these beloved vegan chefs and bloggers to help the animals!

The most delicious part of this culinary assemblage is that 100% of proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

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A beautiful creature gets the love and respect deserved at Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary!

$15

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Check out some of the recipes featured in The Queer Vegan Food ECookbook!

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Pau d'Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Pau d’Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Buy The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

$15

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All proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

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Thank you, and I look forward to hearing how you love the recipes! – Sarah 😉

[Note: The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook is currently available as an E-book PDF, which is sent to your Inbox immediately after you order.]

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I recently wrote a blog on Vegansaurus! in response to articles suggesting you can’t be a healthy high raw vegan. My post, entitled “Eating raw will not ruin your life!” offers insights into how I think about high raw foodism in the overall context of a healthy vegan lifestyle. Some of you lovely readers eat high raw diets, so I thought you might be interested in jumping in on the discussion happening over there.

To read the article and get involved in the discussion about high raw veganism on Vegansaurus!, click here.

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Photo.

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When Lantern Books asked me submit a piece to the anthology Defiant Daughters: 21 Women on Art, Activism, Animals, and The Sexual Politics of Meat (Lantern Books, March 2013) I was thrilled to put to paper some of the many ways that Carol J. Adams’ work has impacted my life and activism career, and to share how my relationship with my brother Asher grew due to our mutual love of Carol’s book The Sexual Politics of Meat and shared commitment to veganism.

The anthology, edited by the fantastic Kara Davis and Wendy Lee with a foreword by Carol J. Adams, features 21 pieces by women artists, feminists, vegans, chefs, professors, and writers from all backgrounds. All proceeds from the anthology go to the wonderful vegan multimedia collective for change, Our Hen House. Jasmin Singer of Our Hen House and I actually share a section in the book entitled “Fish and Frog,” and I recently did a piece for Our Hen House’s online magazine that relates to my essay in Defiant Daughters, which you can read by clicking here.

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Here is the description of the book Defiant Daughters from Lantern Books’ website:

One writer attempts to reconcile her feminist-vegan beliefs with her Muslim upbringing; a second makes the connection between animal abuse and her own self-destructive tendencies. A new mother discusses the sexual politics of breastfeeding, while another pens a letter to her young son about all she wishes for him in the future. Many others recall how the book inspired them to start careers in the music business, animal advocacy, and food. No matter whether they first read it in college or later in life, whether they are in their late teens or early forties, these writers all credit The Sexual Politics of Meat in some way with the awakening of their identities as feminists, activists, and women. Even if you haven’t read the original work, you’re sure to be moved and inspired by these tales of growing up and, perhaps more important, waking up to the truths around us.

My chapter, entitled “Brother Knows Best,” includes the ways in which my coming out as vegan and queer were interconnected, and how Carol J. Adams’ The Sexual Politics of Meat helped me recognize these interconnections. It also discusses the ways in which my friendship with my brother Asher and our mutual commitment to helping animals helped me through it all. Here is an excerpt from my piece:

Unlike his hand-me-down t-shirts and jackets that ended up in my closets, my brother’s vegetarianism fit me well, and I made it my own. When he went off to college, Asher granted me access to his bookshelf, which included his treasured science fiction and war books, french novels, and dog-eared copies of classics we were made to read in high school. Many of his books collected dust in his absence, but when I reached the end of high school, one precious book on his shelf shifted everything in my world: The Sexual Politics of Meat.

The red cover immediately stole my attention. A striking image of a woman in a sexualized pose, with portions of her body demarcated as cuts of meat, was both familiar and disturbing. Its cover offered an immediate opportunity to consider the connection between the consumption of women and animals.

Reading the book at age seventeen, I realized that it was hypo-critical for me to be vegetarian and not vegan, since I believed so deeply in animal welfare and human welfare (my primary reasons for abstaining from animal flesh). I knew that eating cows was out of alignment with my ethics after my brother helped me to see how meat comes at the price of animal suffering, but this text illuminated an entirely new way of understanding how animal agriculture of dairy products reveals the ways in which females are particularly exploited.

Understanding the mechanisms of privilege and power that reinforce the eating of animals helped me recognize how I, a woman coming into my non-normative sexual orientation, related to the animal agriculture industrial complex. As I uncovered universal truths about the connections between oppression toward women and animals, it was in no way coincidental that I came out as a vegan and a lesbian the year I turned eighteen.

Thank you for reading! I am so honored to have been a part of this collection; the other writers are incredibly talented and truly carry the torch of Carol’s work, more than 20 years after The Sexual Politics of Meat was first published. I hope you’ll check out the book when it comes out in March. You can pre-order by clicking here. Additionally, you can “like” the book’s Facebook page and stay tuned for excerpts posted by other contributors in anticipation of the launch.

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These New Year’s Eve inspired chocolate molasses muffins were born of a desire to make a rich, hearty chocolate muffin including the iron-rich goodness of molasses to celebrate a brand new year! I am grateful to be on this vegan adventure and grateful to be sharing this superb recipe! These muffins are gluten-free, soy-free, and delicious. Will they become a NYE tradition?

Gluten-Free Chocolate Molasses Muffins (Makes 16 muffins)

Ingredients:

1 tbs molasses

1 tsp baking soda

1 cup oat flour

1 cup gf all purpose flour

1 tsp acv

1/2 cup applesauce (or 1 medium apple vitamixed)

7 drops stevia

1/4 cup xylitol

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 cup nut mylk

1/2 cup warm water

2 tbs ground flaxseed

1/2 cup chocolate chips

1/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup cacao powder

1 pinch salt

1/4 cup coconut oil

Instructions:

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare muffin tins. Add ground flax seed and hot water to liquid ingredients. Mix dry ingredients. Add liquid to dry.

 Add mixture to tins or greased muffin tray. Bake for 25-28 minutes. Enjoy, and happy 2013! Thank you for reading!

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I just returned from a superb trip to Los Angeles. I absolutely love my friends and family in LA. My wonderful older brother Asher and I are both vegan and get along smashingly (incidentally, he’s @Smasherbrown on Twitter!) and had an amazing time seeing friends, making delicious vegan smoothies, juices, soups, bean dishes, steamed greens, and doing other fun sibling stuff–even cleaning the backyard to indie music at full blast is fun with my brother–seriously.

While in LA I actually only ate at two restaurants–three times = a charm at Sage Organic Vegan Bistro, an Echo Park favorite located on Sunset Blvd. just a few blocks from my brother’s beautiful home, and the second was Xoia Vietnamese restaurant, also on Sunset Blvd a few blocks from Sage, which I went to with my college friend and his lovely partner.

At Xoia, my friends and I shared mushroom/tofu spring rolls to start and as a main I got the Vegetarian Mi Quang, which included wide rice noodles served with tofu, shiitake, enoki and beech mushrooms, lettuce, bean sprouts, sprinkles of crushed peanuts, banana blossom, fresh mints, and sesame crackers in a shiitake broth. Everything was so delicious, I would definitely return!

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Vegetarian Mi Quang at Xoia.

Though I went to Sage three times this trip,  each time I veered in different menu directions. The first visit was a catchup lunch with my fabulous friend Puki. I ordered the “street tacos” and for dessert we shared the raw chocolate espresso cake. It was pretty amazing. In the picture I’ve featured it shows the street tacos served with rice and beans, but I opted to have mine with salad (not pictured).

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Street tacos at Sage. Photo Credit.

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Raw espresso chocolate cake from Sage. Puki took this photo!

The next time I went to Sage was brunch with my brother and some of our mutual friends; my college friend and his partner, Kelsey, and Ivory! I ordered gluten-free vegan waffles and an almond mylk latte. The third time I went was with Mark Hawthorne and lauren Ornelas, who generously took me and my brother out to lunch! I had the kale salad and the chocolate superfood ice cream (amazing) and it was seriously so sweet of Mark and lauren to drive out to Echo Park and to treat us to such a decadent, ethical, organic lunch. Truly lovely.

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The lively Farmers’ Market in downtown LA. I also visited the Sherman Oaks Farmers’ Market this trip.

Other gastronomic highlights of the trip included smoothie making with my bro–we got really into using various protein powders, chia, berries, local fruits and greens and even young thai coconuts! My bro has a Vitamix so it was super convenient to make them each morning–including on the way to BodyPump classes which I attended at a local gym downtown–I’m trying to build these little plant-based muscles! Asher and I also held a little vegan taco dinner party at Pollution Studios, the film studio he runs and co-owns! Some of our friends came down to the studio to help us cook and eat and I want to give special props to the wonderful June Zandona, a sweetheart vegan Los Angeles based director and cinematographer who spearheaded the thumbprint cookie-making.

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Homemade gluten-free vegan thumbprint cookies made in the Pollution Studios kitchen!

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Asher’s pineapple salsa and mulled wine, made at Pollution Studios.

The trip had many other highlights, including gluten free vegan challah making, frequent scenic hikes in Elysian Park, decaf almond mylk lattes at Fix, trips to Erewhon, dancing at Pollution, watching the Avatar cartoon series (it’s a really beautiful and inspiring show with a vegan protagonist!) and beating Zelda: Skyward Sword with my brother, celebrating Christmas with movies and vegan Chinese food (it was pretty good and definitely satisfied our craving for tradition), going to Shabbat at LGBTQ-friendly synagogue Kol Ami while managing to get in some work and writing at the same time. I’m back in Philly now; there’s snow on the ground and I just made the best Spinach Ginger Beet Energy Juice! Here’s the recipe:

Spinach Ginger Beet Energy Juice (Serves 2)

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Ingredients:

1 large beet

1/2 large ginger knob

1 medium cucumber

2 cups spinach

1 small apple

Instructions:

Juice it in a juicer or use my technique to make the juice in a blender. Enjoy immediately.

I’m gearing up for 2013 with my beloved and feeling super grateful for all of the blessings–especially those of family and friends–in my life. Happy 2013!

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Amazing vegan activist/radio host Erin Red and her entertainment co-host Laura Yaz invited me to do a guest appearance on the radio show Erin Red Radio to cover the recent controversy surrounding Ellen DeGeneres and “happy eggs”. It was a great discussion (my interview starts about 1 hour in) and a great show. I was honored to participate and invite you to check it out!

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Finding a Niche For All Animals: A Conference honoring the ecofeminist work of Marti Kheel held at Wesleyan University

This weekend, I attended a conference honoring the life and work of late vegan ecofeminist scholar and activist Marti Kheel. The conference took place at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, and was organized by Wesleyan professor Lori Gruen and one of my personal heroines, Carol J. Adams.

Marti was the author of the classic ecofeminist book Nature Ethics: An Ecofeminist Perspective, which, according to Marti, “seeks to heal the divisions between the seemingly disparate movements and philosophies of feminism, animal advocacy, environmental ethics, and holistic health.” What drew me to Kheel’s work as an undergraduate at Vassar is that it outlines an ecofeminist philosophy that acknowledges the crucial roles of empathy in activism. It has always made intuitive sense to me to apply my “feeling” self to my activism.

The late ecofeminist vegan Marti Kheel.

I love how Marti explained that killing animals is wrong on “logical” grounds, but that we can also argue that one’s feelings about animals, compassion for their lives, and empathy for others’ suffering are valid reasons to be in favor of a plant-based diet.

Marti was a fantastic, determined, strong-minded activist, and a cherished friend to many within this movement and beyond. It was inspiring to see the ripples of her influence through the words of many of her friends and colleagues who spoke at the memorial the first evening of the conference. After a documentary shown about her life and work and a wonderful speech by Marti’s friend and colleague, The Sexual Politics of Meat author Carol J. Adams, other folks stood up and spoke about their personal connections to Marti. Many at the conference had worked very closely with her, including those who were active with Feminists For Animal Rights (FAR), a group Marti created based on her vision. Others had volunteered with Marti for animal rights causes or had been influenced by her during their academic and activist careers. While I did not speak at the memorial, I am lucky to say that I did have the privilege of meeting Marti several years ago while I was living in the Bay Area (she was a raw vegan and we met at an Oakland raw foods event organized by a mutual connection) and we kept in touch as I worked at a raw vegan center which she had visited before we’d met.

Just after meeting Marti, she instantly connected me with queer vegan women’s events she organized in the Bay Area, and we corresponded over e-mail about holistic health, and things related to a book project my partner and I were (and still are) working on about the intersections between holistic health, veganism and LGBTQ communities. The last time I heard from Marti was on October 5, 2011 in an e-mail letting me know she was sick with cancer and that she wanted to help more with our book, and that I should e-mail her questions and ideas quickly because time was of the essence. A few weeks later, on November 19, 2011, I got news that Marti had died. While I hadn’t known Marti as well as others in attendance at the conference, and we were only beginning to discuss and collaborate on ideas, I have been so humbled and grateful that even while sick and facing the end of her life, Marti was immensely committed to helping others and advance the vegan movement.

Heartwarming stories were shared at the memorial portion of the conference including a beautiful story Carol J. Adams told about how Marti began her animal activism as a young person refusing to pose in the family photos unless her family’s pet cat could be included. Several members of Marti’s family were in attendance, and shared how her compassionate approach to veganism influenced them and made more inspired to question aspects of their own lives.

Carol J. Adams speaking at the Marti Kheel Conference.

Panels at the conference referenced Marti’s Ecofeminist work and discussed how Marti’s compassionate approach to activism was infused in every aspect of her life.While the conference was primarily academic in nature–terms like “praxis” and “problemetize” were included in many panelists’ talks based on papers they’d written for the conference–there were great inclusions of practical approaches to activism that I found heartening and inspiring. My friend Lauren Ornelas of Food Empowerment Project and Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition gave a great talk about how her work with FEP considers food justice as a complex issue that requires looking beyond simply checking to see if ingredients are vegan. We must ensure that they are ethically sourced, as in the case of her nonprofit’s commitment to identifying truly ethical vegan chocolate companies that do not trade in child slave labor. (Note: Please sign the petition asking the makers of Clif Bars to disclose where they get their cocoa beans!) Lauren also discussed the importance of a vegan activist approach that is respectful to the needs of diverse communities.

Absolutely inspiring, witty and brilliant vegan duo Mark Hawthorne and Lauren Ornelas.

Theorist Greta Gaard spoke about ecofeminist theory and practice, and mentioned queer sexuality in the context of animal rights (which I loved).  Other talks I found inspiring included pattrice jones’ discussion of her queer-run animal sanctuary Vine Sanctuary, and about how they have all of their important meetings standing up in the barn while surrounded by animals. patrice said a line which really rang true: “All the stuff we really want is free.” patrice said to share with paleo dieters and purported feminists who eat meat: “Tell them that eating meat is something you do to someone else’s body without their consent.” What a powerful and accurate thing to say!

The first evening of the conference was catered with delicious vegan sushi, appetizers and gluten-free vegan treats from a local Connecticut vegan bakery:

Vegan sushi and chocolates served at the Marti Kheel conference.

Mushroom polenta cakes served after the memorial portion of the conference.

Lunch on Saturday was 100% vegan and delicious.

Ivory of vegan myths debunked fame (who is an all-star, best ever vegan conference buddy, the best a gal could ever hope for!) and I met in NY Penn station (I came from Philly, she from Brooklyn) and traveled to the conference together. We had the amazing good fortune of meeting some really wonderful new friends Andrea and Danielle at the conference who convinced us to stay with them in Branford, CT (near Wesleyan) and have a late-night persimmon and almond milk Greek yogurt party instead of staying at a hotel. It did not take too much arm twisting 😉 We had a wonderful time bonding, chatting about our paths to veganism and how we all love plants (PLANTS!)! It was amazing to find some queer vegan women kinship and make incredible, thought-provoking, hilarious new friends!

Vegan lady friends! L to R: Danielle, Andrea and Ivory!

All-organic, fair-trade coffee was served with some soy mylk on the side.

Ecofeminist Greta Gaard speaking about Marti Kheel.

Wesleyan University’s beautiful campus.

Posing after lunch with my heroine and friend Carol J. Adams.

I got to meet Ali, fellow Vassar woman and author of the fabulous vegan food blog Farmers’ Market Vegan!

Ivory, Andrea and I had a great time at the conference!

One activist spoke about her ethical dilemma in not being able to find a vegan infant formula and needing to procure one immediately for her infant in the ICU. She said the D3 in the product was sourced from lanolin, which is from sheep, and that choosing that product was very difficult for her but ultimately was what was necessary to save her son’s life.

After the panel, I commended the activist for finding compassion for herself in this difficult situation, and I suggested the option of reaching out to infant formula brands that use all-vegan ingredients except for the non-vegan D3 and asking them to use vegan D3 in products now that it is available. This was something the panelist had not considered doing, and I think it’s a good example of where businesses and academics can work together to find solutions to problems.

I currently work for a vegan business and have worked for other vegan businesses in the past. I believe in the importance of academia and the influence of scholarship in shaping ideas that later become practiced throughout activist movements, however I also feel it is crucial that we connect the dots and work with businesses to provide vegan alternatives. I think a more vegan-friendly marketplace is a great goal for academics and non-academics (lay people?) alike, and was grateful for the chance to discuss this with her.

My former professor/friend Jill Schneiderman and others admiring the next generation of vegan activists.

For me, Finding A Niche For All Animals involved honoring Marti Kheel and celebrating her legacy, meeting new friends, seeing old friends, connecting with visionaries and a rare and incredibly sweet private lunch with Carol and Ivory in which we discussed our work and plans for the future. I leave with a renewed inspiration that vegan activism must always come from the love and empathy we have inside us that extends outwards to those around us. Thank you for reading.

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I almost didn’t post this recipe. It’s very simple but so rich in flavor and texture that I think it’s worth sharing. These farmers’ market Brussels sprouts paired with quinoa are a great fall dish. I love the rich flavor and crispy texture of the sprouts, and the quinoa adds a lovely nutrient dense crunch.

Baked Balsamic Brussels Sprouts With Curry Quinoa

Ingredients:

Baked Brussels Sprouts

2 cups Brussels Sprouts

1 tbs Balsamic Vinegar

dash salt

2-3 Tbs nutritional yeast

1 Tbs coconut oil or olive oil

Curry Quinoa

1 cup cooked Quinoa

1/4 cup vegetable broth

Curry Powder (to taste)

Instructions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Halve the Brussels sprouts and toss with all ingredients. Add curry powder to cooked quinoa (or add while cooking) and serve together.

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