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Linger in Denver

Linger in Denver, CO

Last night was a superb one–not only did Courtney and I move back into our apartment after three weeks away (it was being repaired post-Boulder flood)–but we were also treated to a magical vegan dinner at Linger in Denver, CO with fabulous new friends The Gay Vegans!

I have admired Dan and Mike of The Gay Vegans from afar for a long time, so it was such a treat to get to meet them! I so admire their compassionate approach to vegan activism; kinder, more caring and passionate vegan activists I’ve never found. These guys are also smart, witty, and charming, and Courtney and I had a lovely time trying out one of their favorite vegan-friendly restaurants, Linger. The Gay Vegans have written about Linger before on their fabulous blog, which you can check out here.

Starting with sweet potato waffle fries and a sweet dipping sauce, we elected to split dishes including a delightful seasonal butternut squash salad, dosas, and a unique carrot falafel dish that came with a smoky, cheesy-like sauce. Heavenly! We also enjoyed some incredibly prepared watermelon appetizers with sugared spicy topping.

For dessert, after laughing and sharing stories and getting to know the people behind the blogs (!), we enjoyed tangerine sorbet and a melt-in-your-mouth homemade peanut butter cup dish that kicked store-bought versions to the curb. Linger has a to-live-for location with a great view of Downtown Denver and a sweet rooftop bar. Linger isn’t a vegan restaurant, but they do right by vegan gourmands! I really love when restaurants that aren’t exclusively vegan feature amazing vegan dishes beyond standard veggie burgers and salads! The waitstaff and owner were also really sweet, which is always wonderful. I highly recommend checking out Linger if you’re in the Denver metro area.

It was a truly delicious meal with uncommonly kind and generous vegan rockstars–I can’t believe how much Mike and Dan of The Gay Vegans do for human- and non-human animals, and Courtney and I were so grateful that they took us to this lovely spot as a great introduction to Colorado. I highly suggest checking out Dan and Mike’s blog if you haven’t yet (aka you’ve been living under a rock!) Also, you can read more about causes The Gay Vegans are involved in and care about here.

Incredible butternut squash salad at Linger in Denver with The Gay Vegans Such a treat!

Incredible butternut squash salad at Linger in Denver with The Gay Vegans Such a treat!

Inventive and delicious falafel merged with carrot and spices and a rediculous vegan yoghurt sauce at Linger in Denver!

Inventive and delicious falafel merged with carrot and spices and a ridiculous vegan yoghurt sauce at Linger in Denver!

Chocolate peanut butter cup genius at Linger with The Gay Vegans and Courtney Pool!

Chocolate peanut butter cup genius at Linger with The Gay Vegans and Courtney Pool!

The gorgeous, kind, compassionate, charming and fabulous gay vegans!

Gorgeous, kind, compassionate, charming and fabulous Dan and Mike from The Gay Vegans!

A nice shot of Linger in Denver, CO. Photo via Gridskipper.com

A nice shot of Linger in Denver, CO. Photo via Gridskipper.com

I am so grateful to be settling into life in Boulder, CO after a bit of a rocky start! I look forward to sharing more news and photos from the Front Range! In other news, I’m proud to say Queer Vegan Food was recently featured as a top “Gay Foodie” blog on The Huffington Post! Check it out!

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Yesterday, I accidentally ate non-vegan hummus.

Yesterday, I accidentally ate non-vegan hummus.

Yesterday, I accidentally ingested dairy in the form of milk hidden in the ingredient list in organic “classic” -flavored hummus sent to me by Eat Well Enjoy Life, a company that wanted me to review various flavors from their line of hummus.

I specifically asked Eat Well Enjoy Life to send only vegan flavors, and so I didn’t even think to check the ingredients of what they sent me. It turns out, they make a lot of vegan flavors, and only a few are made with dairy. I was randomly scanning the ingredients this morning when I saw “contains milk” and my heart sunk. It turns out that in addition to all-vegan hummuses (which are amazing, and are made with really unique vegan ingredients like lentils, white beans, and black beans!), they also sell Greek-yogurt infused hummus. Bummer to the max.

The vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life

The actually vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life. They are great.

The non-vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life. They are made with Greek Yogurt, which wasn't so obvious from the packaging.

The non-vegan flavors from Eat Well Enjoy Life. They are made with Greek Yogurt, which wasn’t so obvious from the packaging.

I haven’t accidentally eaten animal products (that I know of) in a long time, and each time it happens (it’s been only a few times during the 8+ years I’ve been vegan) it’s challenging for me on many levels. I figured I can’t be the only one who has gone through this, so I decided to share what I’ve learned from my recent experience.

Here are the 5 Things I learned From Accidentally Eating Animal Products:

1) Our world is not as vegan as I sometimes wish it were. Weird uses of dairy/eggs/etc. still exist in things one would suspect would be vegan, but you can’t be too careful and it’s always a good idea to double check when trying new products.

2) Companies may claim to understand what veganism is and seem enthusiastic about veganism, but that doesn’t mean they don’t make mistakes. I’ve even seen things labeled vegan that list whey, honey, dairy, and eggs in products’ ingredients. It’s always a good idea to check, educate, and have conversations to really ensure products being received or reviewed are vegan, especially as a food blogger who gets to interact with sales and marketing people on the reg. I think in this case, there was just a miscommunication between the person with whom I interacted and whomever sent out the samples for review. Eat Well Enjoy Life’s vegan hummus flavors are indeed delicious–creamy, spicy, white bean hummus and edamame hummus, and other bean formulations are indeed worthy of telling vegan bloggers about–it’s just a shame they accidentally sent non-vegan samples that I didn’t think to check as well.

3) It’s best to make your own hummus. No matter how great a store-bought hummus, nothing compares to homemade versions. Homemade hummus tastes way fresher and better, I’ve learned. I highly recommend any of the hummus recipes on Choosing Raw.

4) I am human, and sometimes humans forget to check product labels even when they know better. We live in a non-vegan world and this is just another reminder that we all need to do our best to keep educating and helping people understand why we choose to abstain from consuming animal products.

5) Good can come from bad. Today, in honor of my unfortunate accidental ingestion of dairy, I’m going to make a donation to an animal welfare-related cause. I’ve decided to give to Veganism is the Next Evolution (VINE). VINE is a wonderful sanctuary and I highly recommend checking them out. I realize it is a privilege to be able to donate, and my accidental ingestion of animal products is a great excuse for me to put extra attention into doing what I can. (Not that one needs to wait until they accidentally eat animal products to promote animal welfare causes!)

Thanks for reading! xo

I’d love to hear about others’ experiences dealing with this, if anyone has a story related or wants to share?

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As I sit here on a plush mauve couch in a stranger’s warm, well-lit living room drinking fair trade organic French Press coffee with soymilk and stevia, typing away on my computer, I feel really, really grateful, lucky and blessed.

If you’ve been checking the news lately, you have probably heard that Boulder and other parts of Colorado were recently hit damn hard by a historic flood. 

I moved to Boulder a few weeks ago. I wrote a post about it. Courtney and I had just moved into our new apartment four days before the floods hit.

At about 2:30am on Thursday, I awoke to Courtney telling me water was coming up through the floor (we chose a first-floor apartment–oops!) and that we needed to take action. The flood definitely came by surprise.

We have a really sweet landlord who coached us through the necessary steps to leaving the place–putting as much of our stuff as we could up on shelves and on top of the fridge and kitchen cabinets, turning off the power fuse box to avoid electrical issues, putting down towels wherever we could. Twitter confirmed roads were closed and there wasn’t a possibility to go anywhere outside of our building during the storm, so we brought our sleeping bags and blankets to the third floor of our unit and texted with friends in the area to see if they were out of harm’s way, and prayed for those were were vulnerable to the storm. We snapped a selfie to commemorate the crazy evening (look–we’re the Instagram generation!) and then tried to get some sleep in the hallway.

Flood evacuation selfie: 2:30a

Flood evacuation selfie: 2:30a

After some half-sleep, we were rescued by our landlord’s friend, a nurse who showed up in his shining black Subaru while there was a bit of a break in the rain. He took us to a nice home a few blocks away owned by a mutual friend of theirs, which also became home to other flood refugees. I am grateful for their kindness and generosity.

I checked the news and contacted friends and started getting a sense of the true devastation of the flood. Towns and homes destroyed. Our apartment was wrecked by the flood water, but thankfully we were able to grab our laptops, passports, a change of clothes and some rations. Nothing was destroyed that can’t be replaced.

I have to give a big shout-out to Tasty Bite, who miraculously sent me samples of their products to review right before the storm hit. I grabbed some of the yellow bags quickly on my way out, and have been so glad I did! Lots of delicious, easy-to-prepare quick meals have really helped out in a pinch. Tasty Bite will be my new go-to camping or emergency food supply, for sure. It tastes great and doesn’t even require cooking, though I have heated it up and served it with fresh greens.

Best flood food ever.

Tasty Bite is the best flood food ever.

The past few days have meant rebuilding in many senses. Courtney and I have since gone over to our apartment and pulled out soaked drywall, cabinets, and baseboards. Our landlord brought a crew of folks to get started on the construction, and has been amazing in every sense, working quickly to help us get back into our apartment–cross your fingers it’ll hopefully be next week.

Boulder and nearby towns are wrecked–roads destroyed, paths muddied, homes ruined–but there is a sense of resiliency as volunteer crews have already formed to help people and animals cope with the storm’s wake.

It’s been humbling to think of how many have been hurt by this storm. Boulder Pride was slated to happen today, and I agree with the organizer’s decision to postpone it. Now is not the time to party; it’s the time to restore, help out, and rebuild.

As I work remotely, I’ve been able to get some work done amidst this flood chaos, and have been touched by the kindness of the clients with whom I work who have witnessed this from afar.

The muddy Goose Creek path in Boulder, CO.

The muddy Goose Creek path in Boulder, CO.

The Goose Creek Greenway trail filled with mud after the flood.

The Goose Creek Greenway trail filled with mud after the flood.

The Boulder waterways are muddy and in need of repair after the flood.

The Boulder waterways are muddy and in need of repair after the flood.

The iconic flatirons enshrouded in clouds the morning after the flood.

The iconic flatirons enshrouded in clouds the morning after the flood.

A lot of places in Boulder have opened up again, including gyms, Whole Foods, and other local businesses. Life goes on. There is a lot of work to be done to repair what the flood has done to this city and its people, but it’s heartening to see some things springing back to life.

I have been blessed and lucky to be safe and to have been helped out by some truly kind and lovely folks, as well as to have such amazing friends and family who have checked on us and offered love and support from a distance. Thank you, sincerely–it means the world to me.

I hope to post more updates as things progress. Thanks again for all of your love and support, and for reading. xo

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Alas, blog friends, I haven’t written a personal post in ages. This update is long overdue! The big news in my life these days is that Courtney and I recently moved to Boulder, Colorado! We both work remotely and have flexibility with where we live (a major privilege, to be sure) and decided to move our life to the Rockies.

I’ve never lived in Colorado before, and I’d only visited Boulder a handful of times  before moving here, so it’s definitely been an all-new adventure!

So far, I’ve met some awesome new friends and gone on tons of hikes. And eaten some really yummy vegan foods!  Leaf Vegetarian is delightful; Native Foods has an outpost here, and the Farmer’s Market is brilliant. The Ethiopian restaurant Ras Kassa’s has tons of vegan and gluten-free vegan options, and there are a bevy of other places I’ve yet to check out that I’ve heard are amazing.

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Courtney hiking in the Anemone trail in Boulder, CO!

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A view of the Flatirons from North Boulder

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Yummy boba aka bubble tea at Ku Cha House of Tea in Boulder, CO

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Vegan kale chips and hummus at The Kitchen Next Door in Boulder, CO!

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Fresh beets at the Boulder Farmers’ Market!

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Organic sunflowers at the downtown Boulder Farmers’ Market!

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Fresh green juice from Pressery sold at the Boulder Farmer’s Market

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Vegan and gluten-free Injera and Ethiopian food at Ras Kassa’s

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The yummy vegan Taco Salad from Native Foods in Boulder, CO

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A farm-fresh colorful vegan gluten-free meal I cooked in Boulder, Colorado!

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North Boulder Park in Boulder, CO

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A beautiful hike in Boulder, CO

Thanks for reading and checking out my pictures about my new life in Boulder, Colorado! I hope to continue to post more in the near future!

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Never Read The Comments On Queer Vegan Food

The infamous “Never Read The Comments” tote bag guest poster Jamie J. Hagen spotted after Vida Vegan Con this year.

Today, Queer Vegan Food readers are in for a major treat: a really amazing guest post by writer/activist and scholar Jamie J. Hagen. I’ve long been a fan of Jamie’s writing and strong feminist-vegan social media presence, and am SO excited that she volunteered to share this personal and important post about the feminist implications of comment sections on online articles and blogs.

Jamie’s discussion is drawn from her experience as an editor of queer lady site  Autostraddle, and other sites. As a speaker at Vida Vegan Con this year, Jamie led a discussion about how to keep comments sections respectful AND maintain healthy discourse. It’s got my wheels spinning; How do online communities enforce respectful commenting while simultaneously encouraging healthy debate?

I’d love to hear what others think about the comments sections in blogs and whether you think Jamie is right that feminist spaces can benefit from a well-enforced comments policy. Her great questions allow us to consider our own experiences with comments sections, and I’d encourage anyone who feels moved to share to do so.

And now, the post you’ve been waiting for… ~ Sarah

Why I Read The Comments: A Feminist Argument For The Value Of An Engaged Comment Community

By: Jamie J. Hagen

As a freelance writer I’ve received incredibly adamant advice to read the comments. I’ve also received incredibly adamant advice not to read the comments. The worth in responding to comments is a somewhat contentious and confused topic, often overshadowing the potential value of an engaged comment community.

During my time as a Contributing Editor to the girl-on-girl culture website Autostraddle I became a big fan of the potential for conversation and community in the comment space. As a regular writer and reader of the website, I value Autostraddle’s efforts to promote a “safe-space” conversation with a well thought out comment policy.

Their comment policy begins, “We have really funny readers, and we love getting to know you and hearing your opinions. Dialogue with readers is so important to us, in fact, that we are working hard to make sure that Autostraddle remains a safe place for discussion as we get bigger and better.”

Covered in their policy are issues such as bad faith, fat phobia, and trans* inclusion and this has led to many constructive, fun, lively conversations moderated by Autostraddle community moderators. Further vegan, queer food for thought: Some of the members of Autostraddle’s comment community became best friends and even lovers during Autostraddle sponsored events and other offline venues. Some readers aren’t out as queer anywhere but online. Some readers don’t find support for their thoughts and feelings as queers anywhere but on online. Knowing the editors, writers and the comment community are all invested in creating a space to support queer readers who may not find that type of support anywhere else is constantly lauded by many community members.

When writing for other websites I seek to bring this same ethic in responding to the comments. For example, while writing for PolicyMic.com it was made clear that promoting our pieces by engaging with the commenters was encouraged, essentially required, to be a successful writer for the site geared towards a millennial crowd working to create a bi-partisan political dialogue.

From the perspective of someone who has been involved in Autostraddle and other feminist comment spaces I pitched the “Comments Are Your Friend” workshop for the vegan blogging conference Vida Vegan Con II conference in May of this year. As I imagined the workshop, it would offer a space to create a conversation about whether people read the comments, why or why not, and how we can make sure we participate in self-care when writing and commenting about the personal as political. Only after learning I’d be welcomed to host the comment conversation at Vida Vegan Con II did I discover the “Never Read the Comments” tote for sale at Portland‘s vegan grocery story Food Fight – so there‘s that!

At the workshop I opened the conversation for all to share their experiences with comments. Many attendees spoke to the difficulty of discussing vegan politics on personal spaces such as Facebook, but agreed there was a valuable opportunity to educate readers on the web about veganism by simply responding with a non-judgmental factual comment when possible. Attempting to change the minds of those trolling websites to get a rise out of writers certainly seems a fools errand, but a well-articulated comment left in response to a nasty or confrontational comment may reach dozens or even hundreds of readers.

Jamie Hagen and Laura Beck of Vegansaurus and Jezebel At Vida Vegan Con Conference

Jamie Hagen, Laura Beck of Vegansaurus and Jezebel and panel participants at Vida Vegan Con Conference

It’s hard to ignore the impact of gender-based and homophobic attacks endured by female and queer writers online. The recent campaigns by Facebook and Twitter to address violent and repetitive rape threats and the posting of rape videos on their networks speaks to the extent of the problem. Because of this reality, I feel those of us with the ability to build and structure a more feminist space in a blog’s comment community should consider and explore taking the time to do so.

Writing about queer politics, vegan politics or any other ethically charged topic can lead to some difficult and exhausting conversations. Creating a valuable comment space requires work, a well-developed comment policy and the ability to enforce it.  Whether a writer chooses to read or engage with the comment community will vary on context, time commitment to community building and meeting the needs of her own self-care.

Do you have experience engaging with constructive conversation in your comment space? If not, do you think a comment policy and more active engagement from regular readers and writers could shift the tone of a comment space?

Jamie Hagen

Jamie J. Hagen is a writer and doctoral student of Global Governance and Human Security at the University of Massachusetts, Boston with a focus on gender and feminist security studies. As a freelance writer Hagen has covered queer and vegan politics, news, and culture for publications such as RollingStone.com, One Green Planet and Autostraddle

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Animal Camp By Kathy Stevens

While in the process of going vegan, I tore through several vegan-themed books within a couple weeks. Among them: Vegan Freak by Bob and Jenna Torres, Animal Liberation by Peter Singer, Skinny Bitch by Rory Freedman and Kim Barnouin, and, of course, The Sexual Politics of Meat by Carol J. Adams, a book which has profoundly changed my life in more ways than I can count (see: Defiant Daughters).

I read these volumes because each offered various insights to aid my transition to veganism. In 2005, the year I went vegan, there weren’t as many resources available online and as an eighteen-year-old, I didn’t know many peers who were vegan. Books provided information, motivation, and a plan for me to eschew animal products as well as arm myself with language to share my transition with others.

As I approach my eight-year vegan anniversary, I’ll admit I’ve really lagged when it comes to reading animal rights books. Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about the purpose of vegan books for already-vegan audiences. The value of vegan cookbooks for vegans is pretty obvious–who isn’t a fan of new recipe collections? But what about animal rights books for those of us who have already committed to fighting animal welfare injustices? I thought that since I didn’t need to watch Meat Your Meat ever again in order to know why I wouldn’t want to use animal products, there may not be a strong need for me to continue to read vegan books post-transition. After all, didn’t I already “know the deal”?

After reading Animal Camp: Reflections On A Decade of Love, Hope and Veganism at Catskill Animal Sanctuary by Kathy Stevens, I’ve realized why it’s still important for longstanding (ish?) vegans like myself to continue to educate ourselves about animal welfare concerns through vegan books and media. Stevens’ book is beautifully written, filled with stories and anecdotes about what life is really like working at Catskill Animal Sanctuary (CAS), and it has helped me see that there’s still so much I can learn as a vegan about animal welfare issues.

Before reading Animal Camp, I had no idea that animal hoarding cases were some of the top sources of abused animals in need of rescue at places like CAS. I believed animal hoarding was rare and properly addressed under our legal system, but the truth is that the problem is much more prevalent in the United States than I could have imagined, and through archaic laws, animal hoarders are often able to get off with probation and nearly always quickly become repeat offenders. Another shocking fact: many hoarders are even able to receive “animal sanctuary” designations to mask their actions. Stevens describes a chilling seizure of abused animals from another so-called animal sanctuary where starving dogs were literally eating lamas alive. Truly awful to read, yes, but even more awful that it goes on. I hope to continue to learn more about animal hoarding so that I can become a more informed animal welfare advocate.

Another amazing aspect of Animal Camp is that it is filled with heartwarming stories that reveal the diversity of personalities and habits of various animal species at CAS without a trace of anthropomorphism. Think stories of chickens nuzzling up to goats, an abused, malnourished horse and a quadruplet of Giardia-ridden baby cows making complete recoveries due to excellent round-the-clock sanctuary care and their remarkable resilience. Stevens reminds us that every animal is an individual, and that the best thing animal advocates can do is truly to go vegan. Worse than animal hoarding (as bad as it is) is the systematic cruelty inherent to animal agriculture industries.

The depth of information and inspiring stories contained in Animal Camp has renewed my vegan spirit. I know it has and will continue to allow me to be a better vegan advocate and continues to inspire me to be a lifelong vegan. I think it would appeal as easily to a non-vegan as a vegan, but am grateful that as a vegan I have had the opportunity to read it. I can’t wait to read another vegan book soon! Grab your copy of Animal Camp here.

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Sarah Brown-Queer Vegan Food-E Book Cover-r4-01

About a year ago, I dreamed of creating a charity cookbook project to benefit Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, NY. I absolutely LOVE Woodstock, and am in awe of how much they do to help better the lives of non-human (and human!) animals. My vision for the cookbook was to assemble the weirdest, most unique, and delicious recipes from top vegan chefs, bloggers and authors around the world and sell this collection to benefit the sanctuary and donate 100% of proceeds to go towards helping the animals. Today, my dream has come true! 

Introducing . . .The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

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The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook features recipes that do not use animal products of any kind and are truly queer in an effort to expand the vegan culinary canon beyond traditional vegan cuisine, which tends to imitate the non-vegan food world (vegan ice cream, hot dogs, hamburgers, fake meat, mac n’ cheese, etc.) Recipe contributors include: Carol J. Adams, Gena Hamshaw, Rory Freedman, Jason Allen, Allyson Kramer, Christy Morgan, Mish Wish, JL Fields, Lisa Pitman, Courtney Pool, Rande McDaniel, Marlie Centawer, Erika Reir, Eric Levinson, Mariano Caino, Sara Jane Kurpeski, Rochelle Koivunen, Jason Das, Joan L. Brown (my mom!), Stephanie Austin, Heather Pace, Kelly Peloza, Mark Hawthorne, Rachel Lee, Alessandra Seiter, Lee Khatchadourian-Reese, and Heidi George. All recipes were generously donated by these beloved vegan chefs and bloggers to help the animals!

The most delicious part of this culinary assemblage is that 100% of proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

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A beautiful creature gets the love and respect deserved at Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary!

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Check out some of the recipes featured in The Queer Vegan Food ECookbook!

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Blueberry Avocado Salsa by Allyson Kramer

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Supercharged Superfood Nori Love by Mish Divine

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Cabbage Pie by Mariano Caino

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Glorious Green Wraps by Lisa Pitman

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Ube (Purple Yam) Ice Cream by Allyson Kramer

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

Easy Black Bean Enchiladas by Mark Hawthorne

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

My Goodness, Green Goddess Smoothie by Marlie Centawer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Chocolate Covered Potato Chips by Allyson Kramer

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Donut Balls by Sara Jane Kurpeski

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Avocado Lime Cheesecake by Heather Pace

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Berry Lemongrass Granola with Coconut and Cashews by Ali Seiter

Pau d'Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Pau d’Arco Tea Elixir by Marlie Centawer

Buy The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook!

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All proceeds from The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook will go to Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in Woodstock, New York!

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Thank you, and I look forward to hearing how you love the recipes! – Sarah 😉

[Note: The Queer Vegan Food Cookbook is currently available as an E-book PDF, which is sent to your Inbox immediately after you order.]

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When Lantern Books asked me submit a piece to the anthology Defiant Daughters: 21 Women on Art, Activism, Animals, and The Sexual Politics of Meat (Lantern Books, March 2013) I was thrilled to put to paper some of the many ways that Carol J. Adams’ work has impacted my life and activism career, and to share how my relationship with my brother Asher grew due to our mutual love of Carol’s book The Sexual Politics of Meat and shared commitment to veganism.

The anthology, edited by the fantastic Kara Davis and Wendy Lee with a foreword by Carol J. Adams, features 21 pieces by women artists, feminists, vegans, chefs, professors, and writers from all backgrounds. All proceeds from the anthology go to the wonderful vegan multimedia collective for change, Our Hen House. Jasmin Singer of Our Hen House and I actually share a section in the book entitled “Fish and Frog,” and I recently did a piece for Our Hen House’s online magazine that relates to my essay in Defiant Daughters, which you can read by clicking here.

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Here is the description of the book Defiant Daughters from Lantern Books’ website:

One writer attempts to reconcile her feminist-vegan beliefs with her Muslim upbringing; a second makes the connection between animal abuse and her own self-destructive tendencies. A new mother discusses the sexual politics of breastfeeding, while another pens a letter to her young son about all she wishes for him in the future. Many others recall how the book inspired them to start careers in the music business, animal advocacy, and food. No matter whether they first read it in college or later in life, whether they are in their late teens or early forties, these writers all credit The Sexual Politics of Meat in some way with the awakening of their identities as feminists, activists, and women. Even if you haven’t read the original work, you’re sure to be moved and inspired by these tales of growing up and, perhaps more important, waking up to the truths around us.

My chapter, entitled “Brother Knows Best,” includes the ways in which my coming out as vegan and queer were interconnected, and how Carol J. Adams’ The Sexual Politics of Meat helped me recognize these interconnections. It also discusses the ways in which my friendship with my brother Asher and our mutual commitment to helping animals helped me through it all. Here is an excerpt from my piece:

Unlike his hand-me-down t-shirts and jackets that ended up in my closets, my brother’s vegetarianism fit me well, and I made it my own. When he went off to college, Asher granted me access to his bookshelf, which included his treasured science fiction and war books, french novels, and dog-eared copies of classics we were made to read in high school. Many of his books collected dust in his absence, but when I reached the end of high school, one precious book on his shelf shifted everything in my world: The Sexual Politics of Meat.

The red cover immediately stole my attention. A striking image of a woman in a sexualized pose, with portions of her body demarcated as cuts of meat, was both familiar and disturbing. Its cover offered an immediate opportunity to consider the connection between the consumption of women and animals.

Reading the book at age seventeen, I realized that it was hypo-critical for me to be vegetarian and not vegan, since I believed so deeply in animal welfare and human welfare (my primary reasons for abstaining from animal flesh). I knew that eating cows was out of alignment with my ethics after my brother helped me to see how meat comes at the price of animal suffering, but this text illuminated an entirely new way of understanding how animal agriculture of dairy products reveals the ways in which females are particularly exploited.

Understanding the mechanisms of privilege and power that reinforce the eating of animals helped me recognize how I, a woman coming into my non-normative sexual orientation, related to the animal agriculture industrial complex. As I uncovered universal truths about the connections between oppression toward women and animals, it was in no way coincidental that I came out as a vegan and a lesbian the year I turned eighteen.

Thank you for reading! I am so honored to have been a part of this collection; the other writers are incredibly talented and truly carry the torch of Carol’s work, more than 20 years after The Sexual Politics of Meat was first published. I hope you’ll check out the book when it comes out in March. You can pre-order by clicking here. Additionally, you can “like” the book’s Facebook page and stay tuned for excerpts posted by other contributors in anticipation of the launch.

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These New Year’s Eve inspired chocolate molasses muffins were born of a desire to make a rich, hearty chocolate muffin including the iron-rich goodness of molasses to celebrate a brand new year! I am grateful to be on this vegan adventure and grateful to be sharing this superb recipe! These muffins are gluten-free, soy-free, and delicious. Will they become a NYE tradition?

Gluten-Free Chocolate Molasses Muffins (Makes 16 muffins)

Ingredients:

1 tbs molasses

1 tsp baking soda

1 cup oat flour

1 cup gf all purpose flour

1 tsp acv

1/2 cup applesauce (or 1 medium apple vitamixed)

7 drops stevia

1/4 cup xylitol

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 cup nut mylk

1/2 cup warm water

2 tbs ground flaxseed

1/2 cup chocolate chips

1/4 cup raisins

1/4 cup cacao powder

1 pinch salt

1/4 cup coconut oil

Instructions:

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare muffin tins. Add ground flax seed and hot water to liquid ingredients. Mix dry ingredients. Add liquid to dry.

 Add mixture to tins or greased muffin tray. Bake for 25-28 minutes. Enjoy, and happy 2013! Thank you for reading!

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I just returned from a superb trip to Los Angeles. I absolutely love my friends and family in LA. My wonderful older brother Asher and I are both vegan and get along smashingly (incidentally, he’s @Smasherbrown on Twitter!) and had an amazing time seeing friends, making delicious vegan smoothies, juices, soups, bean dishes, steamed greens, and doing other fun sibling stuff–even cleaning the backyard to indie music at full blast is fun with my brother–seriously.

While in LA I actually only ate at two restaurants–three times = a charm at Sage Organic Vegan Bistro, an Echo Park favorite located on Sunset Blvd. just a few blocks from my brother’s beautiful home, and the second was Xoia Vietnamese restaurant, also on Sunset Blvd a few blocks from Sage, which I went to with my college friend and his lovely partner.

At Xoia, my friends and I shared mushroom/tofu spring rolls to start and as a main I got the Vegetarian Mi Quang, which included wide rice noodles served with tofu, shiitake, enoki and beech mushrooms, lettuce, bean sprouts, sprinkles of crushed peanuts, banana blossom, fresh mints, and sesame crackers in a shiitake broth. Everything was so delicious, I would definitely return!

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Vegetarian Mi Quang at Xoia.

Though I went to Sage three times this trip,  each time I veered in different menu directions. The first visit was a catchup lunch with my fabulous friend Puki. I ordered the “street tacos” and for dessert we shared the raw chocolate espresso cake. It was pretty amazing. In the picture I’ve featured it shows the street tacos served with rice and beans, but I opted to have mine with salad (not pictured).

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Street tacos at Sage. Photo Credit.

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Raw espresso chocolate cake from Sage. Puki took this photo!

The next time I went to Sage was brunch with my brother and some of our mutual friends; my college friend and his partner, Kelsey, and Ivory! I ordered gluten-free vegan waffles and an almond mylk latte. The third time I went was with Mark Hawthorne and lauren Ornelas, who generously took me and my brother out to lunch! I had the kale salad and the chocolate superfood ice cream (amazing) and it was seriously so sweet of Mark and lauren to drive out to Echo Park and to treat us to such a decadent, ethical, organic lunch. Truly lovely.

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The lively Farmers’ Market in downtown LA. I also visited the Sherman Oaks Farmers’ Market this trip.

Other gastronomic highlights of the trip included smoothie making with my bro–we got really into using various protein powders, chia, berries, local fruits and greens and even young thai coconuts! My bro has a Vitamix so it was super convenient to make them each morning–including on the way to BodyPump classes which I attended at a local gym downtown–I’m trying to build these little plant-based muscles! Asher and I also held a little vegan taco dinner party at Pollution Studios, the film studio he runs and co-owns! Some of our friends came down to the studio to help us cook and eat and I want to give special props to the wonderful June Zandona, a sweetheart vegan Los Angeles based director and cinematographer who spearheaded the thumbprint cookie-making.

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Homemade gluten-free vegan thumbprint cookies made in the Pollution Studios kitchen!

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Asher’s pineapple salsa and mulled wine, made at Pollution Studios.

The trip had many other highlights, including gluten free vegan challah making, frequent scenic hikes in Elysian Park, decaf almond mylk lattes at Fix, trips to Erewhon, dancing at Pollution, watching the Avatar cartoon series (it’s a really beautiful and inspiring show with a vegan protagonist!) and beating Zelda: Skyward Sword with my brother, celebrating Christmas with movies and vegan Chinese food (it was pretty good and definitely satisfied our craving for tradition), going to Shabbat at LGBTQ-friendly synagogue Kol Ami while managing to get in some work and writing at the same time. I’m back in Philly now; there’s snow on the ground and I just made the best Spinach Ginger Beet Energy Juice! Here’s the recipe:

Spinach Ginger Beet Energy Juice (Serves 2)

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Ingredients:

1 large beet

1/2 large ginger knob

1 medium cucumber

2 cups spinach

1 small apple

Instructions:

Juice it in a juicer or use my technique to make the juice in a blender. Enjoy immediately.

I’m gearing up for 2013 with my beloved and feeling super grateful for all of the blessings–especially those of family and friends–in my life. Happy 2013!

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